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QORGCAT - All-Sky Optical Catalog of Radio/X-Ray Sources

HEASARC
Archive

Overview

The Quasars.org (QORG) Catalog is an all-sky optical catalog of radio/X-ray sources. The QORG Catalog aligns and overlays the year 2001/2 releases of the ROSAT HRI, RASS, PSPC and WGA X-ray catalogs, the NVSS (2002), FIRST (2003) and SUMSS (2003) radio catalogs, the Veron QSO catalog (2003) and various galaxy/star reference catalogs onto the optical APM and USNO-A catalogs. This catalog displays calculated percentage probabilities for each optical, radio/X-ray associated object of its likelihood of being a quasar, galaxy, star, or erroneous radio/X-ray association.

This table contains the main Master QORG catalog (master.dat) and contains all 501,756 radio/X-ray associated optical objects and known quasars which are optically detected in APM/USNO-A. Up to six radio/X-ray catalog identifications are presented for each optical object, plus any double radio lobes (21,498 of these). These are superimposed (and laterally fitted) onto a 670,925,779-object optical background which combines APM and USNO-A data. Other subsets of this master catalog are available at the CDS, including the Free-Lunch catalog, a concise easy-to-read variant of the Master catalog showcasing just one X-ray and/or radio identification for each object, a subset catalog of QSO candidates, and a subset catalog of known QSOs/galaxies/stars.

Objects presented in this catalog are those optical APM/USNO-A objects which are associated with X-ray/radio detections, or any optically-found catalogued QSO/AGN/Bl Lac objects, which have confidence levels >40% of being radio/X-ray emitting optical objects. There are 501,756 objects included in all (including 48,285 catalogued quasars), representing the 99.4% coverage of the sky which is available from the APM and USNO-A. Each object is shown as one entry giving the position in equatorial coordinates, red and blue optical magnitudes (recalibrated) and PSF class, calculated probabilities of the object being, separately, a quasar, galaxy, star, or erroneous radio/X-ray association, any radio identification from each of the NVSS, FIRST and SUMSS surveys, including candidate double-lobe detections, any X-ray identification from each of the ROSAT HRI, RASS, PSPC and WGA surveys, including fluxes and field shifts of those identifications, plus, if already catalogued, the object name and redshift where applicable.

The QORG catalog and supporting data can be accessed from the catalog home page at http://quasars.org/qorg-data.htm Questions or comments on the catalog contents may be directed to the first author Eric Flesch at eric@flesch.org. The authors request that researchers using this catalog make a small acknowledgement of such use in any published papers which thereby result.


Catalog Bibcode

2004A&A...427..387F

References

An all-sky optical catalog of radio/X-ray sources.
    Flesch E., Hardcastle M.J.
   <Astron. Astrophys. 427, 387 (2004)>
   =2004A&A...427..387F

Provenance

This table was created by the HEASARC in November 2004 based on CDS Catalog J/A+A/427/387/master.dat

HEASARC Implementation

After consultation with the first author, the HEASARC deleted 5 entries with duplicate names which were present in the CDS version of the catalog, thereby reducing the number of entries from the 501,761 quoted in the published catalog to 501,756.

Catalog and Survey References

  http://quasars.org/qorg-data.htm : QORG home page
  http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/~apmcat : APM home page
  http://www.nofs.navy.mil : USNO home page
  http://www.cv.nrao.edu/nvss : NVSS home page
  http://sundog.stsci.edu : FIRST home page
  http://www.mpe.mpg.de/xray/wave/rosat/rra : HRI & PSPC home page
  http://wgacat.gsfc.nasa.gov/wgacat/wgacat.html : WGA home page
  http://www.xray.mpe.mpg.de/rosat/survey/rass-fsc : RASS-FSC home page
  http://www.xray.mpe.mpg.de/rosat/survey/rass-bsc : RASS-BSC home page
  http://www.astrop.physics.usyd.edu.au/SUMSS/index.html : SUMSS home page
  http://leda.univ-lyon1.fr : Principal Galaxy catalog (LEDA) home page
  http://www.sdss.org : Sloan Digital Sky Survey
  http://www.2dfquasar.org : 2dF QSO Redshift Survey
  http://www.mso.anu.edu.au/2dFGRS : 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey
  http://nedwww.ipac.caltech.edu : NED
  http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/~huchra : CfA Redshift catalog
    VII/221 : IRAS PSCz Survey Catalog (Saunders+, 2000)
    VII/235 : Quasars and Active Galactic Nuclei (11th Ed.) (Veron+, 2003)
    VIII/65 : 1.4GHz NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) (Condon+ 1998)
    VIII/71 : The FIRST Survey Catalog, Version 03Apr11 (Becker+ 2003)
    VIII/70 : Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey (SUMSS) (Mauch+ 2003)
      IX/10 : ROSAT All-Sky Bright Source catalog (1RXS) (Voges+ 1999)
      IX/29 : ROSAT All-Sky Survey Faint Source Catalog (Voges+ 2000)

Parameters

Name
The QORG name for the object using the IAU-recommended naming convention, in which the location doubles as the name for an object, e.g., QORG J000108.1-373858 refers to the source at J2000 RA and declination of 00 01 08.1, -37 38 58.

RA
The Right Ascension of the optical object in the selected equinox. This was created by the HEASARC based on the name parameter and hence has a precision of 0.1 seconds of time.

Dec
The Declination of the optical object in the selected equinox. This was created by the HEASARC based on the name parameter and hence has a precision of 1 arcsecond.

LII
The Galactic Longitude of the optical object.

BII
The Galactic Latitude of the optical object.

ID_Type
This parameter contains codes which summarize the identification (from the literature) and radio/X-ray associations presented for the optical object, where Q means QSO, G means galaxy, A means AGN, B means BL Lac, S means star, U means unknown with redshift, R means radio source, 2 means double-lobed radio source, and X means X-ray source.

Rmag_Flag
This parameter is a flag which is set to '>' to indicate that the quoted red optical magnitude is the plate limiting depth, used as a bright limit to the actual value, since the object was absent from the plate in the red color.

Rmag
The red optical magnitude for the object. The optical magnitudes have been recalibrated from the original APM/USNO-A values. The estimated accuracy of these values is 0.2 from true, B-R to 0.1. However, USNO-A non-POSS-I objects fainter than 18.5 can have larger errors. Also, extended objects which are brighter than magnitude 13 can be represented as far too bright. If the object's image was absent from the plate taken in this color, the parameter rmag_flag is set to '>' and the rmag parameter contains the plate depth.

Bmag_Flag
This parameter is a flag which is set to '>' to indicate that the quoted blue optical magnitude is the plate limiting depth, used as a bright limit to the actual value, since the object was absent from the plate in the blue color.

Bmag
The blue optical magnitude for the object. The optical magnitudes have been recalibrated from the original APM/USNO-A values. The estimated accuracy of these values is 0.2 from true, B-R to 0.1. However, USNO-A non-POSS-I objects fainter than 18.5 can have larger errors. Also, extended objects which are brighter than magnitude 13 can be represented as far too bright. If the object's image was absent from the plate taken in this color, the parameter bmag_flag is set to '>' and the bmag parameter contains the plate depth.

Optical_Note
This parameter contains codes which summarize additional information about the optical data and behavior of the object:

    p = optical magnitudes are POSS-I E and O.
    (no p)= Not POSS-I, so the magnitudes are UKST R and Bj.
    v = variability over 1 magnitude detected across epochs for both red & blue
    m = proper motion detected across epochs (nominally over 3 arcseconds).
    ? = inferred object, position and optical magnitudes are estimated only for
           each colour where the point-spread function (PSF) is marked as "n".
  

Rmag_PSF_Type
The point-spread function (PSF) class of the object on the red plate using the codes listed below (notice that the Automatic Plate Measuring (APM) Catalog provides the PSF class, but the USNO Catalog does not):

       - = stellar PSF (from APM)
       1 = fuzzy PSF (from APM)
       2 = extended PSF. Can be galaxies, merged stars, etc.
       n = no PSF available, usually USNO-sourced.
       x = no image resolved (image fainter than plate depth, or confused, etc.)
  

Bmag_PSF_Type
The point-spread function (PSF) class of the object on the blue plate using the codes listed below (notice that the Automatic Plate Measuring (APM) Catalog provides the PSF class, but the USNO Catalog does not):

       - = stellar PSF (from APM)
       1 = fuzzy PSF (from APM)
       2 = extended PSF. Can be galaxies, merged stars, etc.
       n = no PSF available, usually USNO-sourced.
       x = no image resolved (image fainter than plate depth, or confused, etc.)
  

Alt_Name
An alternative designation for the source from the literature, when one exists.

Qso_Prob
The confidence that the radio/X-Ray association shows the object is a quasar, in percent. The probability that an object is a QSO/galaxy/star is evaluated from the radio/X-ray association with catalogued QSOs/galaxies/stars. There are four cross-categories, these being the PSF (stellar appearance) of the optical object, its B-R color, the offset of the optical and radio/X-ray positions, and the ratio of the radio/X-ray flux to the optical flux (via the magnitude), and the radio detections are pooled separately from the X-ray detections. Candidates are compared using these qualities to known objects, and the ID probabilities are set by the numerical prevalence of the known objects. These same probabilities are also listed for the known objects, so that the user may judge for themselves the effectiveness of this method in correctly determining the nature of the optical object. Note that the probability of an incorrect association (of the optical object to the radio/X-ray detection) is listed in the false_id_prob parameter, and that the four parameters qso_prob, gal_prob, star_prob, and false_id_prob add up to 100%. Thus the probability of incorrect association is already built into the listed probabilities that the object is a radio/X-ray QSO, galaxy, or star. In this catalog, a quasar is taken as any broad emission-line object, so that definition includes Seyfert-1 galaxies and many/most BL Lacs. However, known objects display the object categories as defined in the Veron catalog of AGN.

Gal_Prob
The confidence that the radio/X-Ray association shows the object is a galaxy, in percent. The probability that an object is a QSO/galaxy/star is evaluated from the radio/X-ray association with catalogued QSOs/galaxies/stars. There are four cross-categories, these being the PSF (stellar appearance) of the optical object, its B-R color, the offset of the optical and radio/X-ray positions, and the ratio of the radio/X-ray flux to the optical flux (via the magnitude), and the radio detections are pooled separately from the X-ray detections. Candidates are compared using these qualities to known objects, and the ID probabilities are set by the numerical prevalence of the known objects. These same probabilities are also listed for the known objects, so that the user may judge for themselves the effectiveness of this method in correctly determining the nature of the optical object. Note that the probability of an incorrect association (of the optical object to the radio/X-ray detection) is listed in the false_id_prob parameter, and that the four parameters qso_prob, gal_prob, star_prob, and false_id_prob add up to 100%. Thus the probability of incorrect association is already built into the listed probabilities that the object is a radio/X-ray QSO, galaxy, or star.

Star_Prob
The confidence that the radio/X-Ray association shows the object is a star, in percent. The probability that an object is a QSO/galaxy/star is evaluated from the radio/X-ray association with catalogued QSOs/galaxies/stars. There are four cross-categories, these being the PSF (stellar appearance) of the optical object, its B-R color, the offset of the optical and radio/X-ray positions, and the ratio of the radio/X-ray flux to the optical flux (via the magnitude), and the radio detections are pooled separately from the X-ray detections. Candidates are compared using these qualities to known objects, and the ID probabilities are set by the numerical prevalence of the known objects. These same probabilities are also listed for the known objects, so that the user may judge for themselves the effectiveness of this method in correctly determining the nature of the optical object. Note that the probability of an incorrect association (of the optical object to the radio/X-ray detection) is listed in the false_id_prob parameter, and that the four parameters qso_prob, gal_prob, star_prob, and false_id_prob add up to 100%. Thus the probability of incorrect association is already built into the listed probabilities that the object is a radio/X-ray QSO, galaxy, or star.

False_Id_Prob
The probability that the radio/X-Ray association is a false association, in percent. The confidence of association is based on the whole-sky density of optical objects with the listed PSF and B-R colors. The density of such objects within x arcseconds of the radio detections is compared with their whole-sky density, and the same for the X-ray detections. Thus, for example, if if the former is ten times the whole-sky density, this would yield an association confidence of 90% (100% x [1 - 1/10]) and a false association confidence of 10%, etc. Whole-sky object densities are sub-categorized by galactic density subclasses to minimize any local-sky bias to within 20% in most cases.

Redshift
The redshift for the object, as taken from the literature.

HRI_ID
The identification of the X-ray source, as taken from the ROSAT HRI Survey.

HRI_Count_Rate
The count rate of the HRI source, in ct/s. This was converted by the HEASARC from the unusual units of ct/hr that were used in the original catalog. The maximum value permitted for this parameter in the original catalog of 99999 ct/hr converts to a maximum value of 27.7775 ct/s in this table.

HRI_Optical_Offset
The angular distance from the HRI detection to the optical object, in arcseconds.

HRI_Optical_PA
The position angle (measured from N increasing to E) from the optical object to the X-ray detection, in degrees.

HRI_Optical_Conf
The confidence in percent that this is a true association.

HRI_Field_ID
The HRI field identification for this detection.

HRI_Field_RA_Shift
The value of the HRI field shift in the RA direction, in arcseconds. The radio and X-ray surveys are comprised of a set of single observations each of which cover a defined swath (field) of sky, but with some uncertainty as to the precise location. The ground-based FIRST, NVSS and SUMSS radio surveys have very little uncertainty, but the ROSAT-satellite-based HRI, RASS, PSPC and WGA surveys typically have positional uncertainty up to 15 arcseconds for the HRI and 5-25 arcseconds for the others. A "best fit" between the detections and the optical background is used to precisely fix the astrometry of each field. This catalog achieves that by weighing the individual objects in the optical background and using likelihood algorithms to determine the best candidates, using the 670,925,779-object HGU optical catalog (the combined APM and USNO-A catalogs) as the control. The correctness of the technique is seen with any number of spot checks, such as the HRI NGC 3628 field US700009H.N1 which has been shifted in RA by +5.8 arcsec (where positive means eastwards) and in declination by -14 arcsec (negative is southwards) to become well-aligned with 5 known quasars in the field.

HRI_Field_Dec_Shift
The value of the HRI field shift in the declination direction, in arcseconds. The radio and X-ray surveys are comprised of a set of single observations each of which cover a defined swath (field) of sky, but with some uncertainty as to the precise location. The ground-based FIRST, NVSS and SUMSS radio surveys have very little uncertainty, but the ROSAT-satellite-based HRI, RASS, PSPC and WGA surveys typically have positional uncertainty up to 15 arcseconds for the HRI and 5-25 arcseconds for the others. A "best fit" between the detections and the optical background is used to precisely fix the astrometry of each field. This catalog achieves that by weighing the individual objects in the optical background and using likelihood algorithms to determine the best candidates, using the 670,925,779-object HGU optical catalog (the combined APM and USNO-A catalogs) as the control. The correctness of the technique is seen with any number of spot checks, such as the HRI NGC 3628 field US700009H.N1 which has been shifted in RA by +5.8 arcsec (where positive means eastwards) and in declination by -14 arcsec (negative is southwards) to become well-aligned with 5 known quasars in the field.

RASS_ID
The identification of the X-ray source, as taken from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS).

RASS_Count_Rate
The count rate of the RASS source, in ct/s. This was converted by the HEASARC from the unusual units of ct/hr that were used in the original catalog. The maximum value permitted for this parameter in the original catalog of 99999 ct/hr converts to a maximum value of 27.7775 ct/s in this table.

RASS_Optical_Offset
The angular distance from the RASS detection to the optical object, in arcseconds.

RASS_Optical_PA
The position angle (measured from N increasing to E) from the optical object to the X-ray detection, in degrees.

RASS_Optical_Conf
The confidence in percent that this is a true association.

RASS_Field_ID
The RASS field identification for this detection.

RASS_Field_RA_Shift
The value of the RASS field shift in the RA direction, in arcseconds. The radio and X-ray surveys are comprised of a set of single observations each of which cover a defined swath (field) of sky, but with some uncertainty as to the precise location. The ground-based FIRST, NVSS and SUMSS radio surveys have very little uncertainty, but the ROSAT-satellite-based HRI, RASS, PSPC and WGA surveys typically have positional uncertainty up to 15 arcseconds for the HRI and 5-25 arcseconds for the others. A "best fit" between the detections and the optical background is used to precisely fix the astrometry of each field. This catalog achieves that by weighing the individual objects in the optical background and using likelihood algorithms to determine the best candidates, using the 670,925,779-object HGU optical catalog (the combined APM and USNO-A catalogs) as the control.

RASS_Field_Dec_Shift
The value of the RASS field shift in the declination direction, in arcseconds. The radio and X-ray surveys are comprised of a set of single observations each of which cover a defined swath (field) of sky, but with some uncertainty as to the precise location. The ground-based FIRST, NVSS and SUMSS radio surveys have very little uncertainty, but the ROSAT-satellite-based HRI, RASS, PSPC and WGA surveys typically have positional uncertainty up to 15 arcseconds for the HRI and 5-25 arcseconds for the others. A "best fit" between the detections and the optical background is used to precisely fix the astrometry of each field. This catalog achieves that by weighing the individual objects in the optical background and using likelihood algorithms to determine the best candidates, using the 670,925,779-object HGU optical catalog (the combined APM and USNO-A catalogs) as the control.

PSPC_ID
The identification of the X-ray source, as taken from the ROSAT PSPC Survey.

PSPC_Count_Rate
The count rate of the PSPC source, in ct/s. This was converted by the HEASARC from the unusual units of ct/hr that were used in the original catalog. The maximum value permitted for this parameter in the original catalog of 99999 ct/hr converts to a maximum value of 27.7775 ct/s in this table.

PSPC_Optical_Offset
The angular distance from the PSPC detection to the optical object, in arcseconds.

PSPC_Optical_PA
The position angle (measured from N increasing to E) from the optical object to the X-ray detection, in degrees.

PSPC_Optical_Conf
The confidence in percent that this is a true association.

PSPC_Field_ID
The PSPC field identification for this detection.

PSPC_Field_RA_Shift
The value of the PSPC field shift in the RA direction, in arcseconds. The radio and X-ray surveys are comprised of a set of single observations each of which cover a defined swath (field) of sky, but with some uncertainty as to the precise location. The ground-based FIRST, NVSS and SUMSS radio surveys have very little uncertainty, but the ROSAT-satellite-based HRI, RASS, PSPC and WGA surveys typically have positional uncertainty up to 15 arcseconds for the HRI and 5-25 arcseconds for the others. A "best fit" between the detections and the optical background is used to precisely fix the astrometry of each field. This catalog achieves that by weighing the individual objects in the optical background and using likelihood algorithms to determine the best candidates, using the 670,925,779-object HGU optical catalog (the combined APM and USNO-A catalogs) as the control.

PSPC_Field_Dec_Shift
The value of the PSPC field shift in the declination direction, in arcseconds. The radio and X-ray surveys are comprised of a set of single observations each of which cover a defined swath (field) of sky, but with some uncertainty as to the precise location. The ground-based FIRST, NVSS and SUMSS radio surveys have very little uncertainty, but the ROSAT-satellite-based HRI, RASS, PSPC and WGA surveys typically have positional uncertainty up to 15 arcseconds for the HRI and 5-25 arcseconds for the others. A "best fit" between the detections and the optical background is used to precisely fix the astrometry of each field. This catalog achieves that by weighing the individual objects in the optical background and using likelihood algorithms to determine the best candidates, using the 670,925,779-object HGU optical catalog (the combined APM and USNO-A catalogs) as the control.

WGA_ID
The identification of the X-ray source, as taken from the WGA (PSPC data) Catalog.

WGA_Count_Rate
The count rate of the WGA PSPC source, in ct/s. This was converted by the HEASARC from the unusual units of ct/hr that were used in the original catalog. The maximum value permitted for this parameter in the original catalog of 99999 ct/hr converts to a maximum value of 27.7775 ct/s in this table.

WGA_Optical_Offset
The angular distance from the WGA PSPC detection to the optical object, in arcseconds.

WGA_Optical_PA
The position angle (measured from N increasing to E) from the optical object to the X-ray detection, in degrees.

WGA_Optical_Conf
The confidence in percent that this is a true association.

WGA_Field_ID
The WGA PSPC field identification for this detection.

WGA_Field_RA_Shift
The value of the WGA field shift in the RA direction, in arcseconds. The radio and X-ray surveys are comprised of a set of single observations each of which cover a defined swath (field) of sky, but with some uncertainty as to the precise location. The ground-based FIRST, NVSS and SUMSS radio surveys have very little uncertainty, but the ROSAT-satellite-based HRI, RASS, PSPC and WGA surveys typically have positional uncertainty up to 15 arcseconds for the HRI and 5-25 arcseconds for the others. A "best fit" between the detections and the optical background is used to precisely fix the astrometry of each field. This catalog achieves that by weighing the individual objects in the optical background and using likelihood algorithms to determine the best candidates, using the 670,925,779-object HGU optical catalog (the combined APM and USNO-A catalogs) as the control.

WGA_Field_Dec_Shift
The value of the WGA field shift in the declination direction, in arcseconds. The radio and X-ray surveys are comprised of a set of single observations each of which cover a defined swath (field) of sky, but with some uncertainty as to the precise location. The ground-based FIRST, NVSS and SUMSS radio surveys have very little uncertainty, but the ROSAT-satellite-based HRI, RASS, PSPC and WGA surveys typically have positional uncertainty up to 15 arcseconds for the HRI and 5-25 arcseconds for the others. A "best fit" between the detections and the optical background is used to precisely fix the astrometry of each field. This catalog achieves that by weighing the individual objects in the optical background and using likelihood algorithms to determine the best candidates, using the 670,925,779-object HGU optical catalog (the combined APM and USNO-A catalogs) as the control.

FS_ID
The radio source identification from the FIRST or SUMSS radio catalog.

FS_Radio_Flux
The radio flux density of the FIRST or SUMSS source, in mJy.

FS_Optical_Offset
The angular distance from the FIRST/SUMSS detection to the optical object, in arcseconds.

FS_Optical_PA
The position angle (measured from N increasing to E) from the optical object to the radio detection, in degrees.

FS_Optical_Conf
The confidence in percent that this is a true association.

NVSS_ID
The radio source identification from the NVSS Radio Catalog.

NVSS_Radio_Flux
The radio flux density of the NVSS Source, in mJy.

NVSS_Optical_Offset
The angular distance from the NVSS detection to the optical object, in arcseconds.

NVSS_Optical_PA
The position angle (measured from N increasing to E) from the optical object to the radio detection, in degrees.

NVSS_Optical_Conf
The confidence in percent that this is a true association.

Lobe1_ID
The FIRST/NVSS identification of the radio lobe #1 associated with the optical object.

Lobe1_Radio_Flux
The radio flux density of the radio lobe #1 associated with the optical object, in mJy. The maximum value that is displayed for this parameter is 99999 mJy (99.999 Jy).

Lobe1_Central_Offset
The angular distance from the detected radio lobe #1 to the central object, in arcseconds.

Lobe1_Central_PA
The position angle (measured from N and increasing towards E) from the central object to the radio lobe #1, in degrees.

Lobe1_Central_Conf
The confidence in percent that this is a true association.

Lobe2_ID
The FIRST/NVSS identification of the radio lobe #2 associated with the optical object.

Lobe2_Radio_Flux
The radio flux density of the radio lobe #2, in mJy. The maximum value displayed for this parameter is 99999 mJy (99.999 Jy).

Lobe2_Central_Offset
The angular distance from the detected radio lobe #2 to the central object, in arcseconds.

Lobe2_Central_PA
The position angle (measured from N and increasing towards E) from the central object to the radio lobe #2, in degrees.

Lobe2_Central_Conf
The confidence in percent that this is a true association.

Ref_Alt_Name
The source catalog for the alternative name identification, given using the following codes:

      2G: 2dFGRS, 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey
           Colless, M., et al. 2001, Cat. <VII/226>
      2Q: 2dF QSO Redshift Survey (2QZ)
           Croom S.M., et al. 2001, Cat. <VII/223>
      3C: 3CRR ,online 3CRR catalog at http://www.3crr.dyndns.org
           Laing R.A., Riley J.M., Longair M.S., 1983MNRAS.204..151L
      6D: 6dF Galaxy Redshift Survey Early Data Release
           Wakamatsu et al. 2002, IAU Regional Assembly, ASP Conf. Proc., in press
      6Q: 6dF QSO Redshift Survey (6QZ), Croom S.M. et al. 2003, MNRAS, submitted
      CF: CfA Redshift catalog, Huchra J. P., et al. 1996, Cat <VII/193>
      CN: Common Name Cross Index, Smith, W.B., 1996 unpublished, Cat. <IV/22 >
      CV: Atlas of Cataclysmic Variables, Downes, R. A., et al. 2001, Cat. <V/110>
      EN: ENEAR, Redshift-Distance Survey of Nearby Early-Type Galaxies
           Wegner, G., et al., astro-ph/0308357, submitted to AJ.
      GC: General catalog of Variable Stars (Vol 1) with Improved Coordinates
           Samus, N.N., et al. 2002, Cat. <J/other/PAZh/28/201>
      HD: Henry Draper Extension Charts, Nesterov V.V. et al. 1995, Cat. <III/182>
      LB: Large Bright Quasar Survey
           Hewett P.C., Foltz C.B., Chaffee F.H. 1995, Cat. <J/AJ/109/1498>
      LC: Las Campanas Redshift Survey, Shectman et al. 1996, Cat. <VII/203>
      NE: NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED)
      NL: revised New Luyten Two-Tenths catalog of high proper-motion stars
           Salim, S., Gould, A. 2003, Cat. <J/ApJ/582/1011>
      PG: Principal Galaxy catalog, Lyon-Meudon Extragalactic Database (LEDA)
           Paturel, G., Bottinelli, L., Gouguenheim, L. , See Cat. <VII/237>
      PS: IRAS PSCz Redshift Survey, Saunders, W., et al. 2000, Cat. <VII/221>
      SD: SDSS, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS Data Release 1)
           Abazajian, K., et al. 2003, AJ, submitted; astro-ph/0305492
      TY: Tycho, Hog et al. 2000, Cat. <I/259>
      UG: catalog of Arcsecond Positions of UGC Galaxies
           Cotton W.D., Condon J.J. 1999, Cat. <J/ApJS/125/409>
      VE: catalog of Quasars and Active Nuclei, 11th edition,
           Véron-Cetty, M.-P., Véron, P. 2003, Cat. <VII/235>
      WD: Spectroscopically Identified White Dwarfs
           McCook G.P., Sion E.M. 1999, Cat. <III/235>
      YL: Yale, the Bright Star catalog, 5th Revised Ed.
           Hoffleit E.D., Warren Jr. W.H., 1991, Cat. <V/50>
      ZW: Updated Zwicky Catalog, Falco E.E., et al 1999, Cat. <J/PASP/111/438>
  

Ref_Redshift
The source catalog for the quoted redshift value, given using the same codes as for the ref_alt_name parameter.

Sky_Density_Bin
The sky density bin for optical sources at this sky location, i.e., the approximate number of sources per square degree. Twelve sky density bins were used:

  Density Bin    Density Range (per sq deg)

    6000               1-  6000
    8000            6001-  8000
   10000            8001- 10000
   12000           10001- 12000
   15000           12001- 15000
   18000           15001- 18000
   22000           18001- 22000
   34000           22001- 34000
   45000           34001- 45000
   60000           45001- 60000
  100000           60001-100000
  150000                >100000
  

Contact Person

Questions regarding the QORGCAT database table can be addressed to the HEASARC User Hotline.

Page Author: Browse Software Development Team
Last Modified: 6-Oct-2009