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PDSOID - Phoenix Deep Survey Optical and Near-Infrared Counterparts Catalog

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Overview

Using a deep Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) radio survey covering an area of ~3 deg2 to a 4-sigma sensitivity of >= 100 microJy (uJy) at 1.4 GHz, the authors study the nature of faint radio galaxies. The region, 2 degrees in diameter and centered on RA and Dec (J2000.0) of 1h 14m 12.16s, -45o 44' 08.0" (Galactic latitude of -71o), is known as the Phoenix Deep Field. About 50% of the detected radio sources are identified with an optical counterpart revealed by CCD photometry to mR = 22.5 magnitudes. Near-infrared (K-band) data are also available for a selected sample of the radio sources, while spectroscopic observations have been carried out for about 40% of the optically identified sample. These provide redshifts and information on the stellar content. Emission-line ratios imply that most of the emission-line sources are star-forming galaxies, with a small contribution (~ 10%) from Seyfert 1/Seyfert 2 type objects. The authors also find a significant number of absorption-line systems, likely to be ellipticals. These dominate at high flux densities ( > 1 mJy) but are also found at sub-mJy levels. Using the Balmer decrement, they find a visual extinction AV = 1.0 for the star-forming faint radio sources. This moderate reddening is consistent with the (V - R) and (R - K) colors of the optically identified sources. For emission-line galaxies, there is a correlation between the radio power and the H-alpha luminosity, in agreement with the result of Benn et al. (1993, MNRAS, 263, 98). This suggests that the radio emission of starburst radio galaxies is a good indicator of star formation activity.

When calculating luminosities, the authors assume a cosmology with a Hubble constant H0 of 50 km s-1 Mpc-1 and a deceleration parameter q0 of 0.5.


Catalog Bibcode

1999MNRAS.306..708G

References

The Phoenix Survey:
optical and near-infrared observations of faint radio sources.
    Georgakakis A., Mobasher B., Cram L., Hopkins A., Lidman C.,
    Rowan-Robinson M.
   <Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 306, 708 (1999)>
   =1999MNRAS.306..708G

Provenance

This table was created by the HEASARC in June 2013 based on an electronic version of Table 1 from the reference paper, which details the photometric (optical and near-infrared), radio, spectroscopic and intrinsic properties of the faint radio sources in the PDS with established redshifts, which was obtained from the CDS web site (their catalog J/MNRAS/306/708 file table1.dat).

Parameters

Source_Number
A running source number in order of increasing J2000.0 Right Ascension, which uniquely identifies the radio source.

Name
The radio source designation using the '[GMC99b] ' prefix and and the radio source number, as recommended by the CDS Dictionary of Astronomical Nomenclature.

RA
The Right Ascension of the optical counterpart of the radio source in the selected equinox. This was given in J2000 coordinates and to a precision of 0.001 seconds of time in the original table.

Dec
The Declination of the optical counterpart of the radio source in the selected equinox. This was given in J2000 coordinates and to a precision of 0.01 arcseconds in the original table.

LII
The Galactic Longitude of the optical counterpart of the radio source.

BII
The Galactic Latitude of the optical counterpart of the radio source.

Vmag
The apparent 'total' magnitude (see Section 2.2.5 of the reference paper for a definition of this quantity) of the optical counterpart of the radio source in the V waveband.

Rmag
The apparent 'total' magnitude (see Section 2.2.5 of the reference paper for a definition of this quantity) of the optical counterpart of the radio source in the R waveband.

Kmag
The apparent 'total' magnitude (see Section 2.2.5 of the reference paper for a definition of this quantity) of the optical counterpart of the radio source in the K waveband.

Flux_1p4_GHz
The flux density of the radio source at 1.4 GHz, in mJy.

VR_Color
The (V - R) color of the optical counterpart of the radio source, calculated using aperture photometry (see Section 2.2.5 of the reference paper for details).

VR_Color_Error
The uncertainty in the (V - R) color of the optical counterpart of the radio source.

RK_Color
The (R - K) color of the optical counterpart of the radio source, calculated using aperture photometry (see Section 2.2.5 of the reference paper for details).

RK_Color_Error
The uncertainty in the (R - K) color of the optical counterpart of the radio source.

Redshift
The spectroscopic redshift of the optical counterpart of the radio source.

Redshift_Flag
This flag parameter indicates the quality Q of the redshift estimate for the source, as follows:

     - a value Q = 3 corresponds to three or more identified spectral features,
        indicating a firmly established redshift.
     - a value Q = 1 or 2 corresponds to one or two identified spectral features,
        respectively.
     - a value Q = 0 corresponds to the 18 cases where the apparent optical
        counterpart is a star, most of which lie at large angular separations
        from the radio position. The authors expect most of the stellar
        candidate identifications to be spurious.
  

Log_1p4_GHz_Luminosity
The logarithm of the radio luminosity of the source at 1.4 GHz, in W Hz-1.

Abs_Rmag
The absolute R-band magnitude, MR of the optical counterpart of the radio source., calculated using the `total' R-band apparent magnitude, mR.

Log_Halpha_Luminosity
The logarithm of the H-alpha luminosity of the optical counterpart of the radio source, in W (107 erg s-1).

Rf_Halpha_EW
The rest-frame H-alpha equivalent width of the optical counterpart of the radio source, in Angstroms.

Rf_Halpha_Ew_Error
The uncertainty in the rest-frame H-alpha equivalent width of the optical counterpart of the radio source, in Angstroms.

Rf_Oii_3727a_EW
The rest-frame [O II] 3727 A line equivalent width of the optical counterpart of the radio source, in Angstroms.

Rf_Oii_3727a_Ew_Error
The uncertainty in the rest-frame [O II] 3727 A line equivalent width of the optical counterpart of the radio source, in Angstroms.

Broad_Type
The spectral classification of the source into one of 5 types, as described in Section 4.1 of the reference paper:

     Absorption   - galaxies with only absorption lines in their spectra
     Star-forming - star-forming galaxies
     Sy1 or Sy2   - Seyfert 1 or 2 galaxies
     Unclassified - unclassified objects
     Star         - probably unrelated Galactic star
  

Class
The HEASARC Browse/Xamin object classification of the source, based on the broad_type parameter.


Contact Person

Questions regarding the PDSOID database table can be addressed to the HEASARC User Hotline.

Page Author: Browse Software Development Team
Last Modified: 20-Jun-2013