Announcements of Upcoming Meetings

Notice that this list is not meant to be all-inclusive, but concentrates on meetings of potential interest to X-ray, gamma-ray, cosmic-ray, and gravitational astrophysicists. The HEASARC also maintains a list of on-line proceedings of high-energy astrophysics meetings. Updates, corrections, and/or suggestions about meetings should be sent to stephen.a.drake@nasa.gov

Other Sources of Information on Upcoming Meetings

List of International Astronomy meetings maintained by the Canadian Astronomy Data Center
Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Space Calendar


High Energy Astrophysics meetings

2014 May 12 - 15: 9th International Astronomical Consortium for High Energy Calibration (IACHEC) Meeting

2014 May 18 - 23: 10th LISA Symposium

2014 May 29 - 30: Frontiers of Neutron Stars Astrophysics

2014 June 4 - 6: Chalonge Meudon Workshop 2014: From Large to Small Scale Structures in Agreement with Observations: CMB, WDM, Galaxies, Black Holes, Neutrinos and Sterile Neutrinos

2014 June 16 - 19: Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Multi-messenger Era

2014 June 16 - 19: XMM-Newton Conference: "The X-ray Universe 2014"

2014 July 4 - 11: 19th International School of Cosmic Ray Astrophysics: Exploring the High Energy Universe

2014 July 9 - 11: The X-Ray View of Galaxy Ecosystems (Chandra Science Workshop)

2014 July 23 - 25:: 18th Paris Cosmology Colloquium 2014: LATEST NEWS FROM THE UNIVERSE : LAMBDA WARM DARK MATTER (LambdaWDM), CMB, DARK MATTER, DARK ENERGY, NEUTRINOS AND STERILE NEUTRINOS

2014 July 28 - August 1: Physics of Neutron Stars - 2014

2014 July 28 - August 1: 5th Fermi Asian Network (FAN) Workshop

2014 August 2 - 10: COSPAR 2014: 40th Scientific Assembly of the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) and Associated Events, including:

2014 August 17 - 21: HEAD Meeting

2014 September 15 - 19: 10th INTEGRAL Workshop: A Synergistic View of the High Energy Sky

2014 September 15 - 19: IAU Symposium 313: Extragalactic Jets from Every Angle

2014 November 17: Chandra Calibration and CIAO Workshop

2014 November 18 - 21: Fifteen Years of Science with Chandra Symposium

2016 Spring: HEAD Meeting

2017 August: HEAD Meeting


Other Selected Astronomy, Physics and Space Science meetings

2014 April 28 - May 1: Habitable Worlds Across Time and Space (2014 STScI Spring Symposium)

2014 June 1 - 5: American Astronomical Society Meeting 224

2014 June 30 - July 1: Fast Outflows in Massive Stars: From Single Objects to Wind-Fed and Colliding-Wind Binaries

2014 July 7 - 11: Galaxies in 3D across the Universe (IAU Symposium 309)

2014 July 28 - August 1: AGN vs. Star Formation: the Fate of the Gas in Galaxies

2014 August 11 - 15: Supernovae in the Local Universe: Celebrating 10,000 Days of Supernova 1987A

2014 September 15 - 19: IAU Symposium 313: Extragalactic Jets from every angle

2014 December 1 - 5: PLANCK 2014: The Microwave Sky in Temperature and Polarization

2015 January 4 - 8: American Astronomical Society Meeting 225

2015 August 3 - 14: XXIV IAU General Assembly

2016 January 3 - 7: American Astronomical Society Meeting 227

2016 June 12 - 16 American Astronomical Society Meeting 228


Selected Astronomy-related Physics, Computational, Data Analysis, Software or Statistics meetings

2014 May 26 - 29: IAU Symposium 306: Statistical Challenges in 21st Century Cosmology

2014 June 2 - 6: Summer School in Statistics for Astronomers X

2014 June 9 - 10: Statistical Modeling of Cosmic Populations

2014 June 11 - 13: Bayesian Computing for Astronomical Data Analysis


High Energy Astrophysics meetings

9th International Astronomical Consortium for High Energy Calibration (IACHEC) Meeting

Dates: 2014 May 12 - 15
Regular Registration Deadline: 2014 March 1
Place: Warrenton, Virginia, USA

The International Astronomical Consortium for High Energy Calibration (IACHEC, pronounced "Calibration Meeting") aims to provide standards for high energy calibration and supervise cross calibration between different missions.

10th LISA Symposium

Dates: 2014 May 18 - 23
Deadline for Early Registration and Regular Abstract Submission: 2014 March 31
Deadline for Accommodation Reservations: 2014 April 18
Place: Gainesville, Florida, USA

This is the first LISA Symposium following the L3 selection in Europe and the last Symposium before the LISA Pathfinder launches. It is also the last Symposium before advanced LIGO will start its next science run and hopefully the last in the US before the first direct detection is made by the advanced interferometric detector network and/or by pulsar timing arrays which continue to improve their sensitivity.

We are at an important crossroad for our field and the Symposium is the only place where we will be able to gather the entire community from around the world to take stock of our technologies, compare our data analysis techniques, and explore the scientific opportunities of LISA. It is also the only opportunity for a wider discussion about potential future options and what we as a community need to do to move our field forward in these exciting but also challenging times.

Frontiers of Neutron Star Astrophysics (web site not up yet)

Dates: 2014 May 29 - 30
Place: Ithaca, New York, USA

A meeting on open problems and future directions in neutron star astrophyics will be at Cornell University. The topics covered will include radio pulsars and magnetars, magnetic field evolution, models of neutron star interiors and equation of state, supernova explosion mechanisms, accreting neutron stars, binary neutron star mergers, gravitational waves and electromagnetic counterparts, tests of general relativity using pulsars, etc. The meeting will consist of 18 invited talks, a number of contributed talks and a panel discussion.

Chalonge Meudon Workshop 2014: From Large to Small Scale Structures in Agreement with Observations: CMB, WDM, Galaxies, Black Holes, Neutrinos and Sterile Neutrinos

Dates: 2014 June 4 - 6
Deadline for Registration: 2014 May 1
Place: Meudon, Paris, France

A Turning Point operated recently in the Dark Matter research: Warm Dark Matter (WDM) emerged impressively over Cold Dark Matter (CDM) as the leading Dark Matter candidate. WDM solves naturally the problems of CDM and CDM + baryons. LambdaWDM provides the same large scale and CMB results as LambdaCDM and agrees with the observations at the galactic and small scales. Warm Dark Matter (WDM) implies progress in the astrophysical, cosmological, particle and nuclear physics context. This workshop addresses the latest developments in WDM, including its distribution function and equation of state, the quantum mechanical framework to galaxy structure reproducing in particular the observed galaxy cores and their sizes and the dwarf galaxies. This workshop puts together astrophysical, cosmological, particle and nuclear WDM, astronomical observations, theory and WDM analytical and numerical frameworks which reproduce the observations. The Workshop addresses as well the theorical and experimental search for the leading WDM particle candidate: keV sterile neutrinos.

Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Multi-messenger Era

Dates: 2014 June 16 - 19
Deadline for Registration and Abstract Submission: 2014 March 31
Place: Paris, France

Despite the recent progress in Gamma-Ray Burst science, obtained in particular thanks to the Swift and Fermi satellites, there are still many open questions in the field. One concerns the mechanisms that power these extreme explosions, which are still unclear after more than four decades since their discovery. In particular the content of the relativistic flow that produce the GRBs remains to be investigated: especially in terms of its geometry, bulk Lorentz factor, magnetization, and baryon loading, and internal dissipation mechanisms. The nature of GRB progenitors is also debated. While there is a consensus on progenitors of long GRBs, as being very massive stars, the situation is less clear for what concerns the short GRBs: the most popular models involve the possibility of a coalescence of two compact objects (NS+NS/NS+BH), but a direct proof of this model is still lacking. In addition, an important issue is the possibility for GRBs to be the source of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic-Rays (UHECR).

All these questions can be tackled with the use of upcoming neutrino and gravitational waves facilities, the so-called new-messengers. First neutrino candidates from a cosmic source have been recently detected by IceCube but they could not be correlated with any precise astrophysical source. While no direct observation of gravitational waves has yet been claimed, it is widely believed that a first detection could plausibly occur in the near future. GRBs are among electromagnetic counterpart candidates, and a simultaneous detection would represent a major milestones bridging neutrino and gravitational wave observations with conventional astronomy. Neutrinos could play an important role in understanding the mechanisms of cosmic-ray acceleration, and their detection from a cosmic source would be a direct evidence of the presence of hadronic acceleration. The production of neutrinos of 100 TeV then necessitates the acceleration of protons up to PeV energies and is therefore expected independently of the question to know if GRBs are the source of UHECRs. Depending on the details of the model considered, these high-energy neutrinos are emitted in coincidence with, or as a precursor signal to gamma-ray emission.

A new generation of gravitational wave detectors, Advanced LIGO, Advanced Virgo and Kagra, are currently under construction and will reach their design sensitivity around 2018-2020. Thanks to the ten-fold improvement in sensitivity with respect to the previous generation, these detectors are likely to make the first direct detection of gravitational waves. GRBs are believed to be an important source of gravitational waves, since post-Newtonian theory predicts a distinctive gravitational-wave chirp signal from the inspiral stage of NS-NS or NS-BH coalescences, so that the detection of such a signal associated with a short GRB would provide "smoking gun" evidence for the binary nature of the GRB progenitor. In addition recent studies are also focusing on the possibility of GW emission from long GRB.

This workshop (which will be limited to about a hundred participants) will cover the following topics

  • GRB prompt and afterglow emission
  • GRB progenitors
  • Particle acceleration mechanisms, radiation processes, neutrinos and UHECR
  • Neutrino detection techniques and experiments
  • GW detection techniques and experiments
  • GRB Science with future space and ground-based experiments

XMM-Newton Conference: "The X-ray Universe 2014"

Dates: 2014 June 16 - 19
Deadline for Abstract Submission: 2014 February 28
Deadline for Early Registration: 2014 April 28
Place: Dublin, Ireland

The symposium is the fourth international meeting in the series "The X-ray Universe". The intention is to gather a general collection of research in high energy astrophysics. The symposium will provide a showcase for results, discoveries and expectations from current and future X-ray missions.

Session topics will include:

* Stars and star-forming Regions, Solar System Studies
* Interacting Binary Systems, Galactic Black Holes, Micro-quasars
* Cataclysmic Variables and Novae
* Isolated Neutron Stars and Pulsars
* Planetary Nebulae, SN, SNR, PWN, Gamma-ray Bursts and Afterglows
* Galaxies, Galaxy Surveys, Population Studies, ISM and Diffuse Galactic Emission
* Active Galactic Nuclei
* Clusters of Galaxies
* Extragalactic Surveys and Population Studies, the Cosmic X-Ray Background, WHIM and Cosmology
* The future of X-ray Astronomy

Hot topics:

* Accretion Physics
* Physics of Magnetised Objects
* General Relativity: Compact Objects and Reverberation
* Extrasolar Planets and their Hosts
* The Galactic Centre
* Transients of the Multi-Band Sky
* The Sunyaev-Zeldowich effect: Recent results
* The Sky at High Energies

More information, including details on the key dates for registration and abstract submission is available via the conference web page.

The 19th International School of Cosmic Ray Astrophysics (ISCRA-19): Exploring the High Energy Universe

Dates: 2014 July 4 - 11
Deadlines: None, but applications should be made ASAP, see the web site
Place: Erice, Sicily, Italy

Many of the astrophysical 'messengers' have their origin in high energy processes in our universe. Whether it is charged cosmic rays, gamma rays or neutrinos, high energy, often explosive, processes play a crucial role. Moreover, detailed information about such processes requires measurements to ever increasing particle energy, a regime in which the intensity is small. This necessitates extremely large experiments and observations over many years, or even decades. The construction of many of these new generation instruments have been completed in recent years and they are starting to provide new results. The 19th Course of the ISCRA will focus on the astrophysics made available through present and planned experiments, from ground based to space based investigations.

For young experimentalists and theoreticians it is, often, difficult to build an overview and perspective of the new high-energy astrophysics and how this has affected our understanding of the cosmos. The course is designed to provide this overview from both lectures and from discussions with experts in the field who have been chosen, in the ISCRA tradition, not only for their scientific work but also for their communication skills. It will also provide a perspective of what is expected from planned observatories. Participants will have the opportunity to meet informally the scientists at the forefront of these exciting advances, to ask about what excites and motivates them and where they believe the field is going. The lunch, dinner, and Marsala room discussions provide a unique view of how today's experts view the field, and of the many anecdotes that never enter scientific papers, but which had profound influences on the scientists and their successes.

Topics include:

balloon, satellite and ground based measurements of cosmic rays,
gamma ray astronomy from satellites and atmospheric Cherenkov detectors,
neutrino underwater and under-ice observatories,
multi-wavelength observations of cosmic-ray sources,
acceleration and propagation of high-energy particles through the Universe, and
measurements of the cosmic microwave background.

Chandra Science Workshop: The X-ray View of Galaxy Ecosystems

Dates: 2014 July 9 - 11
Final Deadline for Contributed Talk Abstract Submission: 2014 April 25
Final Deadline for General Registration and Poster Abstract Submission: 2014 May 23
Final Deadline for Hotel Reservations at Group Rate, and for All Requests for Letters of Invitation: 2014 June 14

Place: Boston, Massachusetts, USA

X-ray observations are providing exciting results about the formation and evolution of galaxies, bringing new insight into the interplay between galaxies and the diverse physical components of which they are composed, and with which they interact. This workshop focuses on the physics occurring within and around galaxies, with a particular emphasis on diffuse hot gas, but including galactic nuclei, the growth of SMBH, stellar/AGN feedback, stars and star formation, and environmental effects (e.g., stripping, mergers). The goals of this workshop are to bring together observers and theorists to review what we have learned in the last decade and to identify important but unsolved problems whose solution could significantly improve our understanding of galaxies, looking towards the most effective use of X-ray observatories in the next decade.

18th Paris Cosmology Colloquium 2014: LATEST NEWS FROM THE UNIVERSE : LAMBDA WARM DARK MATTER (LambdaWDM), CMB, DARK MATTER, DARK ENERGY, NEUTRINOS AND STERILE NEUTRINOS

Dates: 2014 July 23 - 25
Deadline for Registration: 2014 June 1
Place: Paris, France

The new concordance model in agreement with observations: LambdaWDM (Lambda-dark energy-Warm Dark Matter). Recently, Warm (keV scale) Dark Matter emerged impressively over CDM (Cold Dark Matter) as the leading Dark Matter candidate. Astronomical evidence that Cold Dark Matter (LambdaCDM) and its proposed tailored baryonic cures do not work at galactic and small scales is staggering. LambdaWDM solves naturally the problems of LambdaCDM and agrees remarkably well with the observations at galactic and small scales as well as large and cosmological scales. In contrast, LambdaCDM simulations only agree with observations at large scales.

In the context of this new Dark Matter situation, which implies novelties in the astrophysical, cosmological, particle and nuclear physics context, the 18th Paris Colloquium 2014 is devoted to the Latest News from the Universe. This Colloquium is within the astro-fundamental physics spirit of the Chalonge School, focalised on recent observational and theoretical progress in the CMB, dark matter, dark energy, the new WDM framework to galaxy formation, and the effective theory of the early universe inflation with predictive power in the context of the LambdaWDM Standard Model of the Universe. The Colloquium addresses as well the theory and experimental search for the WDM particle physics candidates (keV sterile neutrinos). Astrophysical constraints including sterile neutrino decays points the sterile neutrino mass m around 2 keV or nearly larger.

In summary, the aim of the meeting is to put together real data: cosmological, astrophysical, particle, nuclear physics data, and hard theory predictive approach connected to them in the framework of the LambdaWDM Standard Model of the Universe.

Physics of Neutron Stars -- 2014

Dates: 2014 July 28 - August 1
Deadline for Abstract Submission and Registration: 2014 March 16
Place: St. Petersburg, Russia

The conference will cover all major topics of observations and theory of neutron stars, including rotation powered pulsars, pulsar emission mechanisms, pulsar wind nebulae, magnetars, isolated cooling neutron stars, central compact objects, accreting X-ray pulsars (particularly, millisecond pulsars), neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries, X-ray bursts, equation of state, structure and evolution of neutron stars, mechanisms of supernova explosions and neutron star mergers.

The meeting contact e-mail is ns "at" astro.ioffe.ru.

5th Fermi Asian Network (FAN) Workshop

Dates: 2014 July 28 - August 1
Deadline for Registration: 2014 June 15
Place: Yilan, Taiwan

The FAN collaboration consists of high-energy astrophysicists mainly from Taiwan, Hong Kong and Korea, and we are aiming to answer some of the major astrophysical problems by using data taken with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. In order to review our effort and expand our collaboration, we will hold the 5th workshop in Taiwan. The emphasis of this workshop will be on both discussions and formal presentations. We will also hold a mini hand-on training course to help students and postdoc to analyze Fermi data. Participants from any country are welcome.

The core topics of the workshop will cover:

* AGN/Galactic Center
* Diffuse gamma-ray sources
* Fermi transients
* Gamma-ray binaries
* Gamma-ray bursts
* Magnetars
* Millisecond and rotation powered pulsars
* Supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae
* Unidentified Fermi objects 

40th Scientific Assembly of the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) and Associated Events: COSPAR 2014

Dates: 2014 August 2 - 10
Scientific Program Chair: Prof. M.I. Panasyuk, Moscow State University
Abstract Submission: Now Open
Deadline for Abstracts: 2014 February 14
Place: Moscow, Russia

Topics:

Approximately 120 meetings covering the fields of COSPAR Scientific Commissions (SC) and Panels:

- SC A:  The Earth's Surface, Meteorology and Climate
- SC B:  The Earth-Moon System, Planets, and Small Bodies of the Solar System
- SC C:  The Upper Atmospheres of the Earth and Planets Including Reference Atmospheres
- SC D:  Space Plasmas in the Solar System, Including Planetary Magnetospheres
- SC E:  Research in Astrophysics from Space
- SC F:  Life Sciences as Related to Space
- SC G:  Materials Sciences in Space
- SC H:  Fundamental Physics in Space
- Panel on Satellite Dynamics (PSD)
- Panel on Scientific Ballooning (PSB)
- Panel on Potentially Environmentally Detrimental Activities in Space (PEDAS)
- Panel on Radiation Belt Environment Modelling (PRBEM)
- Panel on Space Weather (PSW)
- Panel on Planetary Protection (PPP)
- Panel on Capacity Building (PCB)

- Panel on Education (PE)

- Panel on Exploration (PEX)

- Special events:  interdisciplinary lectures, round table, etc.

Selected papers published in Advances in Space Research, a fully refereed journal with no deadlines open to all submissions in relevant fields.

Contact COSPAR Secretariat, c/o CNES, 2 place Maurice Quentin, 75039 Paris Cedex 01, France: Tel: +33 1 44 76 75 10, Fax: +33 1 44 76 74 37, or via e-mail at cospar@cosparhq.cnes.fr.

Associated scientific events of particular interest to the HEASARC and LAMBDA communities include (note that these events will be held on 3 half days during the COSPAR Assembly):

COSPAR 2014 Event E1.1: Accreting Neutron Stars

Accreting neutron stars provide a unique opportunity to explore the properties of matter in extreme conditions and test fundamental physical theories in extreme environments. In the LMXBs, the X-ray features generated at the surface (e.g., thermonuclear X-ray burst) and the inner part of the accretion disk (e.g., relativistic iron line) offer tools to probe the super-dense stellar core matter and the strong gravity regime. The HMXBs, most of which are high-magnetic field accreting pulsars, are excellent objects for study of disk and magnetospheric interactions, X-ray emission mechanisms and propagation in high magnetic field plasma etc. This event aims to include the new theoretical and observational results, as well as reviews, related to accreting neutron stars, and discuss innovative ideas regarding future work. The event will somewhat stress on Astrosat which will provide newer opportunities, e.g., probing the reprocessing of thermonuclear bursts in X-ray binaries with simultaneous multi-wavelength observations.

COSPAR 2014 Event 1.2: New Broadband Perspectives on the Galactic Center Black Hole and its Environment

On the heels of a successful decade of observations and theoretical studies of the central region of our Galaxy, the past two years have produced a remarkable new set of data that promise to significantly improve our understanding of this important region. In addition, several large space observational programs focused on Sgr A*, the radiative counterpart of the central super-massive black hole at the nucleus of our Galaxy, and its environment will be conducted with Chandra, XMM-Newton, Spitzer, Suzaku, Fermi, Herschel, Nu-Star and other observatories before the meeting begins. These data, coupled to ground-based observations with the VLT, Keck and HESS/HESS2, will produce a base upon which we expect to further develop our interpretation and modeling of high-energy processes at the Galactic Center. We intend to gather observers and theorists to discuss the Infrared to TeV emission from the supermassive black hole, the inner 600 light-year region of the Galaxy, and the recently discovered Fermi Bubbles extending to high latitudes.

Topics that will be discussed include:

Observations and modelling of the Sgr A* quiescent and flaring emission,
Sgr A* close environment including the G2 object approaching the black hole,
Prominent thermal and non-thermal X-ray features within the Central Molecular Zone, the past activity of the supermassive black hole and other energetic phenomena, and
Cosmic ray acceleration, propagation and interaction in the CMZ and beyond: X-ray and gamma-ray observations

COSPAR 2014 Event 1.3: X-ray Astrophysics of Hot Massive Stars

New generation of X-ray telescopes allowed important development in the astrophysics of hot massive stars. While some questions about X-ray emission from massive stars have been answered, there are unexpected findings pointing out that our picture of stellar winds is not yet complete. High-resolution spectroscopy, time monitoring, and detailed imaging in X-rays allow to probe stellar atmospheres, magnetospheres, and stellar winds and their impact on interstellar medium and galactic ecology. In this meeting, the most important progress made from the X-ray studies of Wolf-Rayet, O, B, and A-type stars and massive star clusters will be reviewed and the opportunities presented by new facilities will be discussed.

COSPAR 2014 Event 1.4: X-Ray Spectroscopy of Large-scale Plasmas

High-resolution spectroscopy of cosmic X-ray sources has brought very rich science in the past decade for a wide range of objects from stars, SNRs to clusters and superclusters of galaxies, through extensive studies with Chandra, XMM-Newton and Suzaku. This field is about to experience a big leap forward with the launch of ASTRO-H (currently planned in 2015) which carries a microcalorimeter experiment with energy resolution of about 5 eV. Many features about the chemical, dynamical, and physical properties of hot plasmas will be revealed for the first time. In this symposium we will discuss the present and the future of high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy for large-scale cosmic plasmas. The objects discussed in this symposium will range from SNRs, galaxies, groups, clusters and superclusters of galaxies, and large-scale structures. We will review our current understanding of these cosmic plasmas and look forward to new science which will result from future high-resolution spectroscopy. Theoretical progress in this field will also be an important subject.

COSPAR 2014 Event E1.5: Outflows and Accretion from White Dwarfs to Supermassive Black Holes

Our picture of accretion onto stellar-mass compact objects was changed in the past two decades by the discovery of relativistic ejections associated with accretion events. These jets are an important component to understand the full physical picture. The presence of jets provides another aspect to the comparison and scaling with AGN, where these components have been known for much longer. More recently, slower outflows in the form of winds have been discovered in X-ray binaries, also constituting a significant component in the system. The connection between these outflows and those observed in AGN is not yet clear, nor is that with the outflows present in cataclysmic variables. The event is aimed at discussing the most recent results from X-ray and multi-wavelength observations, and at bringing together the communities working on accretion and ejection onto white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes of all masses.

Main topics:

Accretion onto compact objects: from discs to spherical symmetric modes
The physics of raising jets and winds
The accretion/ejection connection
Scaling laws from stellar-mass to supermassive compact objects
Radio-loud versus radio-quiet: which systems produce jets?
Winds: non-relativistic outflows, their origin and structure
Feedback: how does the environment impact on outflows, and how do outflows alter the environment?

COSPAR 2014 Event E1.6: Origin of Cosmic Rays

The resolution of a century-long mystery of cosmic ray (CR) origin is probably around the corner. The CR spectrum spans a huge energy range, 108 - 1020 eV, that at first glance appears as an almost featureless power-law, apart from two kinks (the "knee" at 3 x 1015 eV and the "ankle" at 1018 eV). The CRs below the "knee", and possibly even up to the "ankle", are likely to be galactic, presumably accelerated in supernova remnant (SNR) shocks, while the higher energy particles are clearly extra-galactic in origin. The absence of more pronounced "footprints" of possible acceleration mechanisms and CR sources has been making this problem so difficult to solve. However, the modern satellite, balloon, and ground-based detectors uncover surprising features in the CR spectra challenging the models of CR acceleration and propagation. Spectacular recent discoveries of the Helium and positron excesses in background CR spectra, direct measurements of gamma emission from a number of SNR, new CR results at the highest energies, and new theoretical models will be highlighted during this event. This session encourages presentations of new experimental approaches and theoretical analyses directed towards answering questions related to the origin of these cosmic messengers.

COSPAR 2014 Event E1.7: CMB and Planck Cosmology Results

Planck was selected as the third Medium-Sized Mission (M3) of ESA's Horizon 2000 Scientific Programme, and is today part of its Cosmic Vision Programme. The satellite's primary goal is to study the early universe through the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. Planck was launched on May 2009 and has been surveying the microwave and sub-millimetre sky since then. The first two all sky surveys have been released on March 21, 2013.

Planck has yields improved measurements for the parameters that define the standard LCDM model, including a highly significant deviation from scale invariance of the primordial power spectrum. In a few cases, Planck's measurements are sensibly discrepant from those earlier accepted. Planck sets new limits on the total neutrino masses and numbers, as well as on several inflationary parameters, and has measured CMB lensing at 25 sigma.

The statistics of the CMB anisotropies is now constrained to high accuracy. At the same time, Planck has provided increased evidence for anomalies in the CMB temperature field that many find uneasy to accommodate within the accepted paradigm. Planck has also delivered all-sky maps of the major diffuse astrophysical components at microwave frequencies. Planck has exploited the SZ effect to detect many previously unknown clusters of galaxies.

This conference will be the ideal forum to review the recent results in the CMB field and analyse future prospects.

COSPAR 2014 Event E1.9: Synergies of Ground-based (sub)mm and Radio Surveys with High Energy Space Data on Transient Sources

A new era of time domain astronomy and transient source astrophysics is emerging with the increasingly larger number of wavelengths in which current wide-field instrumentation enables searches of large areas of sky with a rapid cadence. This adds greatly to the traditional capabilities of X- and gamma-ray astronomy. Also, in wavelengths where wide-field monitoring is not yet possible, observatories are contributing to time domain astronomy by allowing rapid, semi-automatic ToO triggers. In this session we shall explore the latest instrumental developments that facilitate multi-wavelength time domain astronomy from space and from the ground, and the latest discoveries enabled by it.

COSPAR 2014 Event E1.12: Highly Magnetized Neutron Stars

We have recently witnessed many exciting new developments in the study of strongly magnetized neutron stars, with magnetic fields > 1013 G. These sources exhibit a diverse phenomenology, ranging from high-field radio pulsars with surface dipole magnetic fields exceeding B_QED = 4 x 1013 G, some of which emitted SGR-like bursts, through the newly emerging class of transient magnetars that emit only a few bursts on rare occasions followed by a remarkable increase in their quiescent emission, which gradually decays on a timescale of a few years, to "classical" AXP and SGR sources, whose observational properties now appear to be almost indistinguishable.

In this Highly Magnetized Neutron Stars session, we will review recent observational and theoretical results on magnetars and high-field radio pulsars and discuss their theoretical implications. In particular, we will discuss what is required in order to produce SGR-like bursts, which are seen also in objects with a weak inferred surface dipole field, as well as the burst mechanisms as well as their observational phenomenology and relation to their persistent emission and timing behavior. Possible evolutionary links between these different classes of neutron stars will also be discussed: Are these classes different manifestations of the same underlying objects, or do they represent distinct evolutionary sequences? Finally, the prospects for the advancement in understanding these exciting sources with the new space-based missions (such as, eROSITA, NuSTAR), and ground based facilities (e.g., LOFAR, advanced LIGO).

COSPAR 2014 Event E1.13: NuSTAR First Science

The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array Small Explorer Mission is the first focusing high energy X-ray (3-79 keV) telescope in orbit. NuSTAR extends sensitivity by more than a factor 100 over previous telescopes that have operated in this band with sub-arcminute imaging and good spectral resolution. Launched in June 2012, NuSTAR's prime mission extends until August 2014. The baseline mission includes a broad range of scientific investigations ranging from extragalactic surveys, surveys of the Milky way to studies of AGN, supernova remnants, and galaxy clusters. In these sessions we will discuss the primary scientific results and open issues, as well as solicit topics of interest for an extended mission.

COSPAR 2014 Event E1.15: Rotation-powered Pulsars from Radio to the Highest Energies

Rotation-powered pulsars, rapidly rotating neutron stars powered by their spin-down luminosity, are detectable over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from MHz radio to nearly 1 TeV gamma-ray energies. Multiwavelength study of their pulsed emission has recently been extended at the very low end of the spectrum by LOFAR and at the very highest end by ground-based Air Cherenkov telescopes, MAGIC and VERITAS. Rotation-powered pulsars possess the highest spin frequencies and densities of any known objects in the Universe. Together with their extremely high surface magnetic fields, they provide excellent laboratories for studying particle acceleration, the physics of strong gravity and constraining properties of nuclear matter under extreme pressure.

This event will highlight and review exciting new advances in understanding rotation-powered pulsars over the past few years, made possible by observations that have both extended study of their emission into unexplored spectral regions and probed their properties with greatly increased sensitivity. These results, from new radio surveys, Fermi, XMM-Newton, Chandra, NuSTAR and optical/UV telescopes, have been paralleled by theoretical advances in modeling their magnetospheres, emission and magnetic field evolution. We also wish to highlight the new and ongoing multiple uses of rotation-powered pulsars as laboratories for detection of gravitational waves, strong gravity and dense matter.

COSPAR 2014 Event E1.16: SN Remnants and PWN through the Electromagnetic Spectrum

Multi-wavelength studies of supernova remnants (SNRs) has made enormous progress with the launch of the highly sensitive orbital X-ray observatories Chandra, XMM-Newton, INTEGRAL and Suzaku as well as the orbital gamma-ray observatories AGILE, Fermi and ground-based Cherenkov telescope arrays H.E.S.S. MAGIC, VERITAS. The arcsecond resolution of Chandra detectors has provided unique opportunities to perform spatially resolved spectroscopy which allows us to separate emissions of different physical origins. Various structures such as bright knots, synchrotron filaments and rims, shocked ejecta, and swept-up ISM have been resolved from neighboring structures and studied in detail. This has important implications for better understanding of stellar nucleosynthesis, and it has also led to the discovery of multi-TeV particle acceleration and strong non-adiabatic magnetic field amplification in SNR shocks. Relativistic outflows from rotation-powered pulsars produce spectacular pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). They are of fundamental importance as unique systems efficiently transforming their rotational energy into radiation in a very broad wavelength band. The GeV flares discovered in the Crab nebula clearly demonstrated the need for refined models of PWNe.

The aim of the event is a broad discussion of observational appearance of SNRs and PWNe from radio to gamma-rays as wel as of theoretical modeling of these spectacular objects.

COSPAR 2014 Event E1.17: Energetic Death of Massive Stars

The event will focus on the most energetic explosions following the collapse of massive stars, Supernovae and GRB. Main topics include: the latest stages of stellar evolution and explosion models, progenitors of GRBs, emission models and theory, multimessenger observations of GRB, SN and their remnants, the formation of early objects in the high redshift universe (Pop III stars, primordial BHs) and related studies, the use of GRB and Supernovae as beacons for cosmology and evolution of large scale structures from the high redshift to the local universe, their role in the cosmo-chemical evolution of the Universe, present and future instrumentation relevant to the field.

COSPAR 2014 Event E1.18: The Variable Galactic Hard X-ray Sky

The hard X-ray sky is now populated with more than one thousand sources after 10 years of observations from sensitive wide-field instruments on board INTEGRAL and SWIFT which augment the legacy provided by instruments like RXTE/ASM.

Archives of this data form a powerful resource for combined temporal and spectral studies. Indeed, the hard X-ray sky is incredibly variable, and studies have been performed on a range of timescales from the search for faint GRBs, through the discovery of weeks-long orbital periods and recurrent outbursts in HMXBs, and even to a search for year-long super-orbital variations in LMXBs. The search for variability in the supermassive black holes powering AGN is another important use of the long-term light curves coming from current missions.

This event will focus on this hot and important topic producing current science, and also as a key diagnostic tool for future high-energy missions.

COSPAR 2014 Event E1.19: Challenges in the Unified Model of AGN

Unified Models for AGN have been able to explain the observational characteristics of the great majority of the AGN population. Indeed, the orientation effect is mostly responsible for the observed differences among the diverse AGN classes. However, from the observational point of view, more and more exceptions to the Unified Models are found and a number of open questions still need to be answered: why about half of the brightest Seyfert 2 galaxies lack the broad optical lines in their polarized spectra? why a few low accreting type 2 Seyfert galaxies lack both optical broad lines and X-ray absorption? More in general, how does the internal AGN structure (accretion flow, jet/winds, BLR, torus, etc.) evolve depending on the central engine intrinsic properties (i.e., the accretion rate)? With this event we propose to draw a refined view of the Unified Model picture focussing on its exceptions, both from the observational and theoretical point of view.

COSPAR 2014 Event E1.20: Gravitational Wave Astrophysics

Gravitational-wave astronomy will provide us with a new probe of the Universe and enable us to answer deep questions about astrophysics and strong-field general relativity. As the first direct detections of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources are imminent, this is a perfect time to take stock of the available techniques for analyzing signals from gravitational-wave detectors across multiple frequency bands, including ground-based high-frequency detectors such as LIGO and Virgo, proposed space-borne low-frequency detectors such as LISA, and ultra-low frequency data from pulsar timing arrays. We will focus on the problems of inference from the data and the key issues that must be resolved to maximize the scientific payoff of gravitational waves, including multimessenger observations, for astrophysics and tests of general relativity. We invite participants from the LIGO/Virgo/GEO/KAGRA/INDIGO, LISA, and PTA communities, as well as participation from those interested in binary astrophysics, massive black holes, measurements of gravitational-wave signatures in CMB polarization, tests of gravitation, and astrostatistics.

High Energy Astrophysics Division (HEAD) of the AAS Meeting

Dates: 2014 August 17 - 21
Website and Abstract Submission Open: 2014 March 5
Meeting Registration and Hotel Reservations Submission Open: 2014 April 28
Deadline for Early Abstract Submission: 2014 May 15
Place: Chicago, Illinois, USA

Special Sessions at the HEAD Meeting:

  • Stellar clusters and star formation (Eric Feigelson)
  • Bridging Laboratory and High Energy Astrophysics (Daniel Savin)
  • Cosmic Rays (Martin Israel & Bob Binns)
  • The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) (Zaven Arzoumanian)
  • The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) (Fiona Harrison & Daniel Stern)
  • Ballooning & Sounding Rockets (Henric Krawczynski)
  • Science and Technology for a Successor to the Chandra X-ray Observatory (Alexey Vikhlinin & Harvey Tananbaum)
  • The Gravitational Universe (Guido Mueller)
  • Jobs in High Energy Astrophysics: A Panel Discussion (Rosanne Di Stefano)
  • Space Missions: Why Do They Cost So Much? (Joel Bregman)

and a special, first-time-ever evening special session that will be open to the public on 'The Art in Science' organized by Chryssa Kouveliotou.

10th INTEGRAL Workshop: A Synergistic View of the High Energy Sky

Dates: 2014 September 15 - 19
Registration Opens: Early 2014
Early Registration and Payment Deadline: 2014 March 31
Abstract Deadline: 2014 June 1
Late Registration and Payment Deadline: 2014 July 31
Place: Annapolis, Maryland, USA

The goal of this workshop is to present and discuss (via invited and contributed talks and posters) the latest results obtained in the field of high-energy astrophysics using the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory INTEGRAL, and place these results in the context of other operational space-based missions, such as Swift, Fermi, AGILE, NuSTAR, and MAXI as well as ground-based VHE observatories. Correlative studies in lower energy bands, as well as neutrino and gravitational wave observations are included as relevant for various source classes. The central focus of thus workshop is the synergistic view of the high energy sky, addressing the following scientific topics:

  • X-ray binaries (involving black holes, neutron stars, and white dwarfs)
  • Isolated neutron stars (gamma-ray pulsars, magnetars)
  • Nucleosynthesis (SNe, Novae, SNRs, ISM) and γ-ray lines, including 511 keV
  • Galactic diffuse continuum emission (including Galactic Ridge)
  • Massive black holes in AGNs (blazars, and the nucleus of the Milky Way)
  • Sky surveys, source populations and unidentified gamma-ray sources
  • Cosmic background radiation
  • Gamma-ray bursts
  • Progress in data processing and analysis
  • Future instruments and missions

Action item: If you plan to attend this workshop, please send an expression of interest to integral10ws 'at' sciops.esa.int, indicating your preference for a talk or poster, a tentative title, and whether you or your students may be in need of partial financial support.

IAU Symposium 313: Extragalactic Jets from Every Angle

Dates: 2014 September 15 - 19
Deadline for Abstract Submission for Contributed Talks: 2014 March 1
Deadline for Early Online Registration: 2014 April 1
Deadline for Regular Online Registration: 2014 July 1
Deadline for Abstract Submission for Poster Presentations: 2014 July 1
Place: Galapagos Islands, Ecuador

Extragalactic jets provide the direct observational evidence for a connection between supermassive black holes and surrounding cosmic environment. They deliver the energy released by an accreting black hole to large distances and impact the formation and evolution of surrounding structures. The significance of relativistic jets is visible on many physical scales and in a variety of astrophysical sources. They carry information about the black hole power, spin, accretion state and characteristic timescales, and probe the environment beyond the black hole's immediate sphere of infuence.

In recent years, both space and ground based telescopes are providing new insights to investigate jet physics. New data on jets have been accumulating from space missions such as Swift, XMM-Newton, Chandra, Suzaku, Fermi, Hubble, Spitzer and WISE. Upgraded and future ground based facilities such as JVLA, ATCA, ALMA, LOFAR and SKA will provide higher quality data at both the lowest and highest radio frequencies. At higher energies, the atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, HESS, MAGIC, and VERITAS have provided evidence indicating rapid time variability in jets, and in the future these facilities will be augmented by CTA. Although we are now living in a "golden age" and despite the recent progress, many new and unsolved problems specific to the physical mechanisms underlying jet physics are still under debate.

This is an excellent time to bring together observational astronomers working across the electromagnetic spectrum with theorists to address the pressing questions concerning our understanding of the physics of relativistic jets. The open questions to be addressed include unification scenarios for blazars and radio galaxies, the interactions between jets and their environments, the composition and structure of jets and the mechanisms leading to their collimation, the role of magnetic fields, the mechanisms of particle acceleration in jets, the location of high-energy emission sites, and the scaling of physical jet phenomena with black-hole mass, from Galactic to extragalactic sources.

Chandra Calibration and CIAO Workshop

Dates: 2014 November 17
Details: Soon to Come
Place: Cambridge, Massacusetstts, USA

The workshop will include a morning session discussing recent work on Chandra calibration and CIAO topics and an afternoon hands-on session with CXC staff on hand to answer individual questions and to assist with analysis.

More details will be announced at a later date.

Fifteen Years of Science with Chandra Symposium

Dates: 2014 November 18 - 21
Deadlines: Coming Soon!
Boston, Massachusetts, USA

The sixth in a series, this symposium will highlight key science results from the first 15 years of operation of the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

High Energy Astrophysics Division (HEAD) of the AAS Meeting

Dates: 2016 Spring
place: TBD, USA

High Energy Astrophysics Division (HEAD) of the AAS Meeting

Dates: 2017 August
Place: Jackson Hole, Wyoming, USA

Other Selected Astronomy, Physics and Space Science meetings

Habitable Worlds Across Time and Space (2014 STScI Spring Symposium)

Dates: 2014 April 28 - May 1
Deadline for Abstract Submission: 2014 February 28
On-line Registration Deadline: 2014 March 28
Place: Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Within a matter of years, humanity will know for the first time the frequency of terrestrial planets in orbit around other stars. This knowledge will pave the way for joining research from astronomy, Earth science, and biology to understand the past, present, and future of the Earth within its larger context as one of many habitable worlds throughout the Galaxy. Such work seeks to understand the formation and fate of the Earth as well as predict where and when different bodies will be suitable for both simple and complex forms of life.

In this four-day symposium, scientists from diverse fields will discuss the formation and long-term evolution of terrestrial bodies throughout the various phases of stellar and Galactic evolution. A particular focus will be in how the specific conditions and challenges for habitability on Earth extend to other bodies in the Solar System and beyond. This symposium will include discussions about sites for Galactic habitability that have not yet been given much attention, such as around post-main sequence stars. The existence of these overlooked environments may provide motivation for novel astronomical observations with existing and next generation ground and space-based observatories.

Invited speakers will cover the following topics:

Terrestrial planet formation, volatile delivery, and the formation of moons
Early Earth geochemistry, atmosphere, and the origins of life
The frequency of terrestrial planets across stellar mass
The limits to Earth-like life
Habitability of planets and moons during all phases of stellar evolution
Habitability in low-luminosity environments

American Astronomical Society Meeting 224

Dates: 2014 June 1 - 5
Deadline for Abstract Submission: 2014 March 3, 9:00 pm ET
Deadline for Regular Registration: 2014 April 10
Deadline for Late Registration: 2014 May 15
Place: Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Fast Outflows in Massive Stars: From Single Objects to Wind-Fed and Colliding-Wind Binaries

Dates; 2014 June 30 - July 1
Opening of Registration and Abstract Submission: 2014 January
Abstract submission deadline: 2014 March 15
End of Early Registration: 2014 April 15
End of Late Registration: 2014 June 15
Place: Geneva, Switzerland

The Symposium aims at bringing together specialists from the research fields of massive star evolution, isolated winds from massive stars, wind-fed systems and colliding wind binaries to summarize the state-of-the-art of the theoretical/simulation modelling of fast outflows in these objects and proceed towards a unified view able to explain the currently available multi-wavelength data. Several sections are planned, covering:

* Massive stars evolution and fast outflows
* Observation of massive stars and constraints on their winds properties
* Colliding wind binaries: an overview
* Observations of colliding wind binaries: what do we learn on fast winds parameters from their collisions?
* Wind-fed binaries: an overview
* Observations of wind-fed binaries and connection to massive stars winds

Go to the meeting web site or contact massivestars.outflows 'at' gmail.com for more information.

To be added to the symposium mailing list, fill out the form at http://www.isdc.unige.ch/~bozzo/outflows.html.

Galaxies in 3D across the Universe (IAU Sympoaium 309)

Dates: 2014 July 7 - 11
Pre-registration Begins: 2013 October 04
Registration Begins: 2013 November 15
Deadline for Abstract Submission and Financial Support Applications: 2013 January 31
Deadline for Early registration: 2014 March 31
Deadline for Regular Registration: 2014 July 04

A new epoch with unbiased investigations of intrinsic properties of galaxies and their evolution has just started. High performance technology in 3D-spectroscopy in the optical/NIR regime and in radio interferometry allows for the first time the efficient mapping of stars, gas, and dust, in galaxies near and far. Detailed measurements of individual objects are complemented by surveys aiming at a full census of galaxies across the local Universe. Reaching out to the limits of the Universe, the evolution of spatially resolved properties is traced along the whole cosmic history. Likewise to these observational campaigns, new computer technology and highly advanced algorithms are exploited for detailed simulations to probe the underlying physical and cosmological connection.

In acknowledgement of this new dimension exploring galaxies and to foster new synergies, this IAU symposium 309 aims to bring together the optical and radio communities as well as theoreticians and simulators. A main theme will be to understand the performance of star formation relating its source and fuel to the necessary local physical conditions and processes as well as to the global influence by and its impact on the galaxy and its surroundings. Among the topics to be discussed are:

- The interplay between the gas and dust content and star formation in galaxies
- Spatially resolved properties of gas, dust and stellar populations of galaxies, including their kinematics, distribution and evolution
- Optical/NIR integral field spectroscopy and radio interferometry as well as the methods to analyze the growing complexity of the data

AGN vs. Star Formation: the Fate of the Gas in Galaxies

Dates: 2014 July 28 - August 1
Deadline for Registration and Abstract Submission: 2014 March 14
Place: Durham, United Kingdom

How is AGN activity connected to star formation? This remains one of the key unsolved questions in astronomy and cosmology. Both processes are efficiently driven by a cold gas supply and we should therefore expect a loose connection. However, a slew of empirical and theoretical evidence suggest an unexpectedly tight symbiotic link between AGN activity and star formation, whereby the fueling and regulation of one process is dictated by the other. The effectiveness of this fueling and regulation and (most crucially) whether it is predominantly dictated by AGN activity or star formation is a matter is intense debate, and has important implications for the growth of galaxies and black holes over cosmic time.

The objective of this international workshop is to bring together observers and theorists to discuss the connection between AGN activity and star formation on small (<100 pc), large (~0.1-10 kpc), and cosmological scales to address the following key questions:

* How does star formation and AGN activity compete for cold gas?
* What evidence is there for a symbiotic connection between AGN activity and star formation?
* Do star formation processes drive AGN activity?
* What impact does AGN activity have on star formation?
* How different would the Universe look without AGNs?
* What key tests and observations do we need to make progress?

A significant fraction of the workshop programme will be devoted to discussion. Places at the workshop will be limited to ~70 participants and interested participants are encouraged to register and/or submit abstracts as soon as possible.

Supernovae in the Local Universe: Celebrating 10,000 Days of Supernova 1987A

Dates: 2014 August 11 - 15
Registration and Abstract Submission Opens: 2013 December 1
Deadline for Early Registration and Abstract Submission: 2014 May 15
Place: Coffs Harbour, New South Wales, Australia

Supernovae are a core element of modern astrophysics, providing fundamental insights into stellar evolution, the interstellar medium, astroparticle physics, nucleosynthesis and cosmology. While astronomers now routinely detect enormous numbers of supernovae every year at increasingly large distances, wide-field surveys and all-sky monitoring are now providing an important new element to such studies: there are a growing number of new supernovae being discovered very close to home.

Our modern understanding of supernovae in the local Universe began with Supernova 1987A, for which mid-2014 marks 10,000 days since its discovery. Since that singular event, many other supernovae have been found within tens of megaparsecs of Earth. These events have allowed detailed studies of individual sources and their environments, providing new physical insight on progenitor stars, explosion mechanisms and their aftermath.

At this conference we will explore all the rich information that nearby supernovae now provide, and will discuss ways in which the new generation of wide-field surveys can further add to this harvest. Topics to be discussed will include:

* Observations and modelling of individual nearby supernovae
* Observations and constraints on supernova progenitors
* Progenitor mass loss, pre-supernova activity and supernova "imposters"
* Theories of core collapse, thermonuclear supernovae and explosion mechanisms
* Supernova 1987A at 10,000 days
* Historical supernovae, young supernova remnants and light echoes
* Wide-field surveys, automated classification and new types of transients
* Future instruments: SKA, LSST, eROSITA

IAU Symposium 313: Extragalactic Jets from Every Angle

Dates: 2014 September 15 - 19
Abstract Submission Opens: 2013 November 1
Deadline for Abstract Submission for Contributed Talks: 2014 March 1
Deadline for Early Registration: 2014 April 1
Deadline for Abstract Submission for Posters: 2014 July 1
Deadline for Regular Registration: 2014 July 1
Place: Galapagos, Ecuador

Extragalactic jets provide the direct observational evidence for a connection between supermassive black holes and surrounding cosmic environment. They deliver the energy released by an accreting black hole to large distances and impact the formation and evolution of surrounding structures. The significance of relativistic jets is visible on many physical scales and in a variety of astrophysical sources. They carry information about the black hole power, spin, accretion state and characteristic timescales, and probe the environment beyond the black hole's immediate sphere of influence.

In recent years, both space and ground based telescopes are providing new insights to investigate jet physics. New data on jets have been accumulating from space missions such as Swift, XMM-Newton, Chandra, Suzaku, Fermi, Hubble, Spitzer and WISE. Upgraded and future ground based facilities such as JVLA, ATCA, ALMA, LOFAR and SKA will provide higher quality data at both the lowest and highest radio frequencies. At higher energies, the atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, HESS, MAGIC, and VERITAS have provided evidence indicating rapid time variability in jets, and in the future these facilities will be augmented by CTA. Although we are now living in a 'golden age' and despite the recent progress, many new and unsolved problems specific to the physical mechanisms underlying jet physics are still under debate.

This is an excellent time to bring together observational astronomers working across the electromagnetic spectrum with theorists to address the pressing questions concerning our understanding of the physics of relativistic jets. The open questions to be addressed include unification scenarios for blazars and radio galaxies, the interactions between jets and their environments, the composition and structure of jets and the mechanisms leading to their collimation, the role of magnetic fields, the mechanisms of particle acceleration in jets, the location of high-energy emission sites, and the scaling of physical jet phenomena with black-hole mass, from Galactic to extragalactic sources.

PLANCK 2014: The Microwave Sky in Temperature and Polarization

Dates: 2014 December 1 - 5
Registration: Opening soon
Ferrara, Italy

This conference is dedicated to the scientific results of the second cosmological data release from Planck, the ESA mission to map the anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background ( http://www.esa.int/Planck). Results from other experiments will be presented and discussed as well.

Planck was launched in May 2009 and surveyed the sky continuously until October 2013. A first release happened in March 2013, comprising only temperature data for the first fifteen months of observation, or about two nominal surveys. The second release will take place in late 2014 and will present all of the Planck sky surveys, in temperature and polarization. High quality maps of Cosmic Microwave Background intensity and polarization will be derived, as well as of many astrophysical foregrounds, including synchrotron, free-free and dust emission from the Milky Way, radio and far-infrared emission from external galaxies, the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect in clusters of galaxies, and the Cosmic Infrared Background. The Planck data therefore address an extremely broad range of cosmological and astrophysical science. This conference provides a scientific forum where the scientific results will be discussed.

American Astronomical Society Meeting 225

Dates: 2015 January 4 - 8
Place: Seattle, Washington, USA

XXIV IAU General Assembly

Dates: 2015 August 3 - 14
Place: Honolulu, Hawaii, USA

American Astronomical Society Meeting 227

Dates: 2016 January 3 - 7
Place: Kissimmee, Florida, USA

American Astronomical Society Meeting 228

Dates: 2016 June 12 - 16
Place: San Diego, California, USA

Selected Astronomy-related Technology (e.g., Instrumentation) Meetings

None


Selected Astronomy-related Physics, Computational, Data Analysis, Software or Statistics Meetings

IAU Symposium 306: Statistical Challenges in 21st Century Cosmology

Dates: 2014 May 26 - 29 (Tutorial Day on 2014 May 25)
Deadline for IAU Grant Requests and Associated Abstracts: 2014 January 13
Deadline for Abstract Submission: 2014 March 21
Deadline for Registration: 2014 April 11
Place: Lisbon, Portugal

Full exploitation of the very large surveys of the Cosmic Microwave Background, Large-Scale Structure, weak gravitational lensing and future 21cm surveys will require use of the best statistical techniques to answer the major cosmological questions of the 21st century, such as the nature of Dark Energy and gravity. Thus it is timely to emphasise the importance of inference in cosmology, and to promote dialogue between astronomers and statisticians. This has been recognized by the creation of the IAU Working Group in Astrostatistics and Astroinformatics in 2012. IAU Symposium 306 will be devoted to problems of inference in cosmology, from data processing to methods and model selection, and will have an important element of cross-disciplinary involvement from the statistics communities.

Summer School in Statistics for Astronomers X

Dates: 2014 June 2 - 6
Deadline for Registration: 2014 May 5, or earlier if the enrollment limit is reached
Place: State College, Pennsylvania, USA

Penn State is continuing its annual Summer Schools in Statistics designed for graduate students and researchers in astronomy. The tenth summer school is an intensive week covering basic statistical inference, several fields of applied statistics, and the R computing environment.

A repertoire of well-established techniques applicable to observational astronomy and physics are developed. Classroom instruction is interspersed with hands-on analysis of astronomical data using the open-source R software package. The course is taught by a team of statistics and astronomy professors with opportunity for discussion of methodological issues. The topics covered include:

  • Exploratory data analysis
  • Hypothesis testing and parameter estimation
  • Regression
  • Bootstrap resampling
  • Model selection & validation
  • Maximum likelihood methods
  • Non-parametric methods
  • Multivariate methods
  • Clustering and classification
  • MCMC
  • Bayesian Analysis
  • Spatial Statistics
  • Time series

Contacts for the 10th school: Eric Feigelson, Dept. of Astronomy & Astrophysics, Penn State University edf@astro.psu.edu, or G. Jogesh Babu, Dept. of Statistics, Penn State University, babu@psu.edu

Statistical Modeling of Cosmic Populations

Dates: 2014 June 9 - 10
Deadline for Registration: 2014 May 5, or earlier if the enrollment limit is reached
Place: State College, Pennsylvania, USA

This two-day session will introduce participants to statistical methods for demographic modeling of cosmic populations, with an emphasis on Bayesian methods based on multilevel models (MLMs) with separate levels of stochastic modeling that explicitly account for uncertainties due to population sampling and measurement errors. Topics to be covered include:

  • Selection effects and measurement errors in astronomical surveys
  • Eddington, Malmquist, and Lutz-Kelker biases/distortions
  • Estimation of observable number-size/number count distributions ("log N - log S")
  • Multilevel models (e.g., empirical and hierarchical Bayesian methods) for estimation of intrinsic distributions, such as luminosity functions for stars and galaxies or distributions of masses and orbital parameters for exoplanet populations
  • Computational methods: Laplace approximation, cubature, Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), approximate Bayesian computation (ABC)

The computational component will be designed as a lead-in to the following session on high-performance statistical computing. Participants interested in cosmic demographics with large datasets are especially encouraged to attend both sessions.

Contact: Tom Loredo, Dept. of Astronomy, Cornell University loredo@astro.cornell.edu

Bayesian Computing for Astronomical Data Analysis

Dates: 2014 June 11 - 13
Deadline for Registration: 2014 May 5, or earlier if the enrollment limit is reached
Place: State College, Pennsylvania, USA

High-Performance Computing for Astronomical Data Analysis & Bayesian Computing will prepare students to harness modern parallel computing hardware for analyzing astronomical data, with an emphasis on applying Bayesian inference to multilevel models. While lectures will include examples from a variety of astronomical applications, the lab exercises will use astronomical data sets and Bayesian multi-level models motivated by the prior school on Statistical Modeling of Cosmic Populations (June 9-10, 2014), so those participating in both parts of the school will experience a seamless transition. By comparing the performance of common Bayesian algorithms, students will develop intuition to help choose the most appropriate algorithms, architectures and programming model for their own research applications.

Lessons will be targeted at graduate students and postdocs in astronomy, astrophysics and physics. Senior researchers interested in learning about Bayesian computing are also welcome to attend. Prospective participants who are not already familiar statistics at the level of an undergraduate course, should participate in the Summer School in Statistics for Astronomers (June 2-6, 2014). Prospective participants not already familiar with Bayesian data anlaysis and multi-level modeling, should also participate in the Statistical Modeling of Cosmic Populations (June 9-10, 2014).

Contact: Eric Ford, Dept. of Astronomy & Astrophysics, Penn State University ebf11@psu.edu


Selected Space Science-related Education and Public Outreach Meetings

None


Page Author: Stephen A. Drake (e-mail: Stephen.A.Drake 'at' nasa.gov)



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