Announcements of Upcoming Meetings

Notice that this list is not meant to be all-inclusive, but concentrates on meetings of potential interest to X-ray, gamma-ray, cosmic-ray, and gravitational astrophysicists. The HEASARC also maintains a list of on-line proceedings of high-energy astrophysics meetings. Updates, corrections, and/or suggestions about meetings should be sent to stephen.a.drake@nasa.gov

Other Sources of Information on Upcoming Meetings

List of International Astronomy meetings maintained by the Canadian Astronomy Data Center
Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Space Calendar


High Energy Astrophysics meetings

2014 August 2 - 10: COSPAR 2014: 40th Scientific Assembly of the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) and Associated Events, including:

2014 August 3 - 9: Very High Energy Phenomena in the Universe (VHEPU-2014)

2014 August 17 - 21: HEAD Meeting

2014 September 15 - 19: 10th INTEGRAL Workshop: A Synergistic View of the High Energy Sky

2014 September 15 - 19: IAU Symposium 313: Extragalactic Jets from Every Angle

2014 October 7 - 11: Hawaii 2014: Fourth Joint Meeting of the APS Division of Nuclear Physics with the Physical Society of Japan

2014 October 20 - 24: Fifth International Fermi Symposium

2014 November 17: Chandra Calibration and CIAO Workshop

2014 November 17 - 28: Advanced School on X-ray Astrophysics

2014 November 18 - 21: Fifteen Years of Science with Chandra Symposium

2014 December 2 - 5: Swift: 10 Years of Discovery

2016 Spring: HEAD Meeting

2017 August: HEAD Meeting


Other Selected Astronomy, Physics and Space Science meetings

2014 August 11 - 15: Supernovae in the Local Universe: Celebrating 10,000 Days of Supernova 1987A

2014 September 15 - 19: IAU Symposium 313: Extragalactic Jets from every angle

2014 November 4 - 7: Cosmology with Galaxy Clusters in the XXIst Century

2014 December 1 - 5: PLANCK 2014: The Microwave Sky in Temperature and Polarization

2015 January 4 - 8: American Astronomical Society Meeting 225

2015 April 20 - 23: Hubble 2020: Building on 25 Years of Discovery

2015 August 3 - 14: XXIV IAU General Assembly

2016 January 3 - 7: American Astronomical Society Meeting 227

2016 June 12 - 16 American Astronomical Society Meeting 228


High Energy Astrophysics meetings

40th Scientific Assembly of the Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) and Associated Events: COSPAR 2014

Dates: 2014 August 2 - 10
Scientific Program Chair: Prof. M.I. Panasyuk, Moscow State University
Abstract Submission: Now Open
Deadline for Abstracts: 2014 February 14
Place: Moscow, Russia

Topics:

Approximately 120 meetings covering the fields of COSPAR Scientific Commissions (SC) and Panels:

- SC A:  The Earth's Surface, Meteorology and Climate
- SC B:  The Earth-Moon System, Planets, and Small Bodies of the Solar System
- SC C:  The Upper Atmospheres of the Earth and Planets Including Reference Atmospheres
- SC D:  Space Plasmas in the Solar System, Including Planetary Magnetospheres
- SC E:  Research in Astrophysics from Space
- SC F:  Life Sciences as Related to Space
- SC G:  Materials Sciences in Space
- SC H:  Fundamental Physics in Space
- Panel on Satellite Dynamics (PSD)
- Panel on Scientific Ballooning (PSB)
- Panel on Potentially Environmentally Detrimental Activities in Space (PEDAS)
- Panel on Radiation Belt Environment Modelling (PRBEM)
- Panel on Space Weather (PSW)
- Panel on Planetary Protection (PPP)
- Panel on Capacity Building (PCB)

- Panel on Education (PE)

- Panel on Exploration (PEX)

- Special events:  interdisciplinary lectures, round table, etc.

Selected papers published in Advances in Space Research, a fully refereed journal with no deadlines open to all submissions in relevant fields.

Contact COSPAR Secretariat, c/o CNES, 2 place Maurice Quentin, 75039 Paris Cedex 01, France: Tel: +33 1 44 76 75 10, Fax: +33 1 44 76 74 37, or via e-mail at cospar@cosparhq.cnes.fr.

Associated scientific events of particular interest to the HEASARC and LAMBDA communities include (note that these events will be held on 3 half days during the COSPAR Assembly):

COSPAR 2014 Event E1.1: Accreting Neutron Stars

Accreting neutron stars provide a unique opportunity to explore the properties of matter in extreme conditions and test fundamental physical theories in extreme environments. In the LMXBs, the X-ray features generated at the surface (e.g., thermonuclear X-ray burst) and the inner part of the accretion disk (e.g., relativistic iron line) offer tools to probe the super-dense stellar core matter and the strong gravity regime. The HMXBs, most of which are high-magnetic field accreting pulsars, are excellent objects for study of disk and magnetospheric interactions, X-ray emission mechanisms and propagation in high magnetic field plasma etc. This event aims to include the new theoretical and observational results, as well as reviews, related to accreting neutron stars, and discuss innovative ideas regarding future work. The event will somewhat stress on Astrosat which will provide newer opportunities, e.g., probing the reprocessing of thermonuclear bursts in X-ray binaries with simultaneous multi-wavelength observations.

COSPAR 2014 Event 1.2: New Broadband Perspectives on the Galactic Center Black Hole and its Environment

On the heels of a successful decade of observations and theoretical studies of the central region of our Galaxy, the past two years have produced a remarkable new set of data that promise to significantly improve our understanding of this important region. In addition, several large space observational programs focused on Sgr A*, the radiative counterpart of the central super-massive black hole at the nucleus of our Galaxy, and its environment will be conducted with Chandra, XMM-Newton, Spitzer, Suzaku, Fermi, Herschel, Nu-Star and other observatories before the meeting begins. These data, coupled to ground-based observations with the VLT, Keck and HESS/HESS2, will produce a base upon which we expect to further develop our interpretation and modeling of high-energy processes at the Galactic Center. We intend to gather observers and theorists to discuss the Infrared to TeV emission from the supermassive black hole, the inner 600 light-year region of the Galaxy, and the recently discovered Fermi Bubbles extending to high latitudes.

Topics that will be discussed include:

Observations and modelling of the Sgr A* quiescent and flaring emission,
Sgr A* close environment including the G2 object approaching the black hole,
Prominent thermal and non-thermal X-ray features within the Central Molecular Zone, the past activity of the supermassive black hole and other energetic phenomena, and
Cosmic ray acceleration, propagation and interaction in the CMZ and beyond: X-ray and gamma-ray observations

COSPAR 2014 Event 1.3: X-ray Astrophysics of Hot Massive Stars

New generation of X-ray telescopes allowed important development in the astrophysics of hot massive stars. While some questions about X-ray emission from massive stars have been answered, there are unexpected findings pointing out that our picture of stellar winds is not yet complete. High-resolution spectroscopy, time monitoring, and detailed imaging in X-rays allow to probe stellar atmospheres, magnetospheres, and stellar winds and their impact on interstellar medium and galactic ecology. In this meeting, the most important progress made from the X-ray studies of Wolf-Rayet, O, B, and A-type stars and massive star clusters will be reviewed and the opportunities presented by new facilities will be discussed.

COSPAR 2014 Event 1.4: X-Ray Spectroscopy of Large-scale Plasmas

High-resolution spectroscopy of cosmic X-ray sources has brought very rich science in the past decade for a wide range of objects from stars, SNRs to clusters and superclusters of galaxies, through extensive studies with Chandra, XMM-Newton and Suzaku. This field is about to experience a big leap forward with the launch of ASTRO-H (currently planned in 2015) which carries a microcalorimeter experiment with energy resolution of about 5 eV. Many features about the chemical, dynamical, and physical properties of hot plasmas will be revealed for the first time. In this symposium we will discuss the present and the future of high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy for large-scale cosmic plasmas. The objects discussed in this symposium will range from SNRs, galaxies, groups, clusters and superclusters of galaxies, and large-scale structures. We will review our current understanding of these cosmic plasmas and look forward to new science which will result from future high-resolution spectroscopy. Theoretical progress in this field will also be an important subject.

COSPAR 2014 Event E1.5: Outflows and Accretion from White Dwarfs to Supermassive Black Holes

Our picture of accretion onto stellar-mass compact objects was changed in the past two decades by the discovery of relativistic ejections associated with accretion events. These jets are an important component to understand the full physical picture. The presence of jets provides another aspect to the comparison and scaling with AGN, where these components have been known for much longer. More recently, slower outflows in the form of winds have been discovered in X-ray binaries, also constituting a significant component in the system. The connection between these outflows and those observed in AGN is not yet clear, nor is that with the outflows present in cataclysmic variables. The event is aimed at discussing the most recent results from X-ray and multi-wavelength observations, and at bringing together the communities working on accretion and ejection onto white dwarfs, neutron stars and black holes of all masses.

Main topics:

Accretion onto compact objects: from discs to spherical symmetric modes
The physics of raising jets and winds
The accretion/ejection connection
Scaling laws from stellar-mass to supermassive compact objects
Radio-loud versus radio-quiet: which systems produce jets?
Winds: non-relativistic outflows, their origin and structure
Feedback: how does the environment impact on outflows, and how do outflows alter the environment?

COSPAR 2014 Event E1.6: Origin of Cosmic Rays

The resolution of a century-long mystery of cosmic ray (CR) origin is probably around the corner. The CR spectrum spans a huge energy range, 108 - 1020 eV, that at first glance appears as an almost featureless power-law, apart from two kinks (the "knee" at 3 x 1015 eV and the "ankle" at 1018 eV). The CRs below the "knee", and possibly even up to the "ankle", are likely to be galactic, presumably accelerated in supernova remnant (SNR) shocks, while the higher energy particles are clearly extra-galactic in origin. The absence of more pronounced "footprints" of possible acceleration mechanisms and CR sources has been making this problem so difficult to solve. However, the modern satellite, balloon, and ground-based detectors uncover surprising features in the CR spectra challenging the models of CR acceleration and propagation. Spectacular recent discoveries of the Helium and positron excesses in background CR spectra, direct measurements of gamma emission from a number of SNR, new CR results at the highest energies, and new theoretical models will be highlighted during this event. This session encourages presentations of new experimental approaches and theoretical analyses directed towards answering questions related to the origin of these cosmic messengers.

COSPAR 2014 Event E1.7: CMB and Planck Cosmology Results

Planck was selected as the third Medium-Sized Mission (M3) of ESA's Horizon 2000 Scientific Programme, and is today part of its Cosmic Vision Programme. The satellite's primary goal is to study the early universe through the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. Planck was launched on May 2009 and has been surveying the microwave and sub-millimetre sky since then. The first two all sky surveys have been released on March 21, 2013.

Planck has yields improved measurements for the parameters that define the standard LCDM model, including a highly significant deviation from scale invariance of the primordial power spectrum. In a few cases, Planck's measurements are sensibly discrepant from those earlier accepted. Planck sets new limits on the total neutrino masses and numbers, as well as on several inflationary parameters, and has measured CMB lensing at 25 sigma.

The statistics of the CMB anisotropies is now constrained to high accuracy. At the same time, Planck has provided increased evidence for anomalies in the CMB temperature field that many find uneasy to accommodate within the accepted paradigm. Planck has also delivered all-sky maps of the major diffuse astrophysical components at microwave frequencies. Planck has exploited the SZ effect to detect many previously unknown clusters of galaxies.

This conference will be the ideal forum to review the recent results in the CMB field and analyse future prospects.

COSPAR 2014 Event E1.9: Synergies of Ground-based (sub)mm and Radio Surveys with High Energy Space Data on Transient Sources

A new era of time domain astronomy and transient source astrophysics is emerging with the increasingly larger number of wavelengths in which current wide-field instrumentation enables searches of large areas of sky with a rapid cadence. This adds greatly to the traditional capabilities of X- and gamma-ray astronomy. Also, in wavelengths where wide-field monitoring is not yet possible, observatories are contributing to time domain astronomy by allowing rapid, semi-automatic ToO triggers. In this session we shall explore the latest instrumental developments that facilitate multi-wavelength time domain astronomy from space and from the ground, and the latest discoveries enabled by it.

COSPAR 2014 Event E1.12: Highly Magnetized Neutron Stars

We have recently witnessed many exciting new developments in the study of strongly magnetized neutron stars, with magnetic fields > 1013 G. These sources exhibit a diverse phenomenology, ranging from high-field radio pulsars with surface dipole magnetic fields exceeding B_QED = 4 x 1013 G, some of which emitted SGR-like bursts, through the newly emerging class of transient magnetars that emit only a few bursts on rare occasions followed by a remarkable increase in their quiescent emission, which gradually decays on a timescale of a few years, to "classical" AXP and SGR sources, whose observational properties now appear to be almost indistinguishable.

In this Highly Magnetized Neutron Stars session, we will review recent observational and theoretical results on magnetars and high-field radio pulsars and discuss their theoretical implications. In particular, we will discuss what is required in order to produce SGR-like bursts, which are seen also in objects with a weak inferred surface dipole field, as well as the burst mechanisms as well as their observational phenomenology and relation to their persistent emission and timing behavior. Possible evolutionary links between these different classes of neutron stars will also be discussed: Are these classes different manifestations of the same underlying objects, or do they represent distinct evolutionary sequences? Finally, the prospects for the advancement in understanding these exciting sources with the new space-based missions (such as, eROSITA, NuSTAR), and ground based facilities (e.g., LOFAR, advanced LIGO).

COSPAR 2014 Event E1.13: NuSTAR First Science

The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array Small Explorer Mission is the first focusing high energy X-ray (3-79 keV) telescope in orbit. NuSTAR extends sensitivity by more than a factor 100 over previous telescopes that have operated in this band with sub-arcminute imaging and good spectral resolution. Launched in June 2012, NuSTAR's prime mission extends until August 2014. The baseline mission includes a broad range of scientific investigations ranging from extragalactic surveys, surveys of the Milky way to studies of AGN, supernova remnants, and galaxy clusters. In these sessions we will discuss the primary scientific results and open issues, as well as solicit topics of interest for an extended mission.

COSPAR 2014 Event E1.15: Rotation-powered Pulsars from Radio to the Highest Energies

Rotation-powered pulsars, rapidly rotating neutron stars powered by their spin-down luminosity, are detectable over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from MHz radio to nearly 1 TeV gamma-ray energies. Multiwavelength study of their pulsed emission has recently been extended at the very low end of the spectrum by LOFAR and at the very highest end by ground-based Air Cherenkov telescopes, MAGIC and VERITAS. Rotation-powered pulsars possess the highest spin frequencies and densities of any known objects in the Universe. Together with their extremely high surface magnetic fields, they provide excellent laboratories for studying particle acceleration, the physics of strong gravity and constraining properties of nuclear matter under extreme pressure.

This event will highlight and review exciting new advances in understanding rotation-powered pulsars over the past few years, made possible by observations that have both extended study of their emission into unexplored spectral regions and probed their properties with greatly increased sensitivity. These results, from new radio surveys, Fermi, XMM-Newton, Chandra, NuSTAR and optical/UV telescopes, have been paralleled by theoretical advances in modeling their magnetospheres, emission and magnetic field evolution. We also wish to highlight the new and ongoing multiple uses of rotation-powered pulsars as laboratories for detection of gravitational waves, strong gravity and dense matter.

COSPAR 2014 Event E1.16: SN Remnants and PWN through the Electromagnetic Spectrum

Multi-wavelength studies of supernova remnants (SNRs) has made enormous progress with the launch of the highly sensitive orbital X-ray observatories Chandra, XMM-Newton, INTEGRAL and Suzaku as well as the orbital gamma-ray observatories AGILE, Fermi and ground-based Cherenkov telescope arrays H.E.S.S. MAGIC, VERITAS. The arcsecond resolution of Chandra detectors has provided unique opportunities to perform spatially resolved spectroscopy which allows us to separate emissions of different physical origins. Various structures such as bright knots, synchrotron filaments and rims, shocked ejecta, and swept-up ISM have been resolved from neighboring structures and studied in detail. This has important implications for better understanding of stellar nucleosynthesis, and it has also led to the discovery of multi-TeV particle acceleration and strong non-adiabatic magnetic field amplification in SNR shocks. Relativistic outflows from rotation-powered pulsars produce spectacular pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). They are of fundamental importance as unique systems efficiently transforming their rotational energy into radiation in a very broad wavelength band. The GeV flares discovered in the Crab nebula clearly demonstrated the need for refined models of PWNe.

The aim of the event is a broad discussion of observational appearance of SNRs and PWNe from radio to gamma-rays as wel as of theoretical modeling of these spectacular objects.

COSPAR 2014 Event E1.17: Energetic Death of Massive Stars

The event will focus on the most energetic explosions following the collapse of massive stars, Supernovae and GRB. Main topics include: the latest stages of stellar evolution and explosion models, progenitors of GRBs, emission models and theory, multimessenger observations of GRB, SN and their remnants, the formation of early objects in the high redshift universe (Pop III stars, primordial BHs) and related studies, the use of GRB and Supernovae as beacons for cosmology and evolution of large scale structures from the high redshift to the local universe, their role in the cosmo-chemical evolution of the Universe, present and future instrumentation relevant to the field.

COSPAR 2014 Event E1.18: The Variable Galactic Hard X-ray Sky

The hard X-ray sky is now populated with more than one thousand sources after 10 years of observations from sensitive wide-field instruments on board INTEGRAL and SWIFT which augment the legacy provided by instruments like RXTE/ASM.

Archives of this data form a powerful resource for combined temporal and spectral studies. Indeed, the hard X-ray sky is incredibly variable, and studies have been performed on a range of timescales from the search for faint GRBs, through the discovery of weeks-long orbital periods and recurrent outbursts in HMXBs, and even to a search for year-long super-orbital variations in LMXBs. The search for variability in the supermassive black holes powering AGN is another important use of the long-term light curves coming from current missions.

This event will focus on this hot and important topic producing current science, and also as a key diagnostic tool for future high-energy missions.

COSPAR 2014 Event E1.19: Challenges in the Unified Model of AGN

Unified Models for AGN have been able to explain the observational characteristics of the great majority of the AGN population. Indeed, the orientation effect is mostly responsible for the observed differences among the diverse AGN classes. However, from the observational point of view, more and more exceptions to the Unified Models are found and a number of open questions still need to be answered: why about half of the brightest Seyfert 2 galaxies lack the broad optical lines in their polarized spectra? why a few low accreting type 2 Seyfert galaxies lack both optical broad lines and X-ray absorption? More in general, how does the internal AGN structure (accretion flow, jet/winds, BLR, torus, etc.) evolve depending on the central engine intrinsic properties (i.e., the accretion rate)? With this event we propose to draw a refined view of the Unified Model picture focussing on its exceptions, both from the observational and theoretical point of view.

COSPAR 2014 Event E1.20: Gravitational Wave Astrophysics

Gravitational-wave astronomy will provide us with a new probe of the Universe and enable us to answer deep questions about astrophysics and strong-field general relativity. As the first direct detections of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources are imminent, this is a perfect time to take stock of the available techniques for analyzing signals from gravitational-wave detectors across multiple frequency bands, including ground-based high-frequency detectors such as LIGO and Virgo, proposed space-borne low-frequency detectors such as LISA, and ultra-low frequency data from pulsar timing arrays. We will focus on the problems of inference from the data and the key issues that must be resolved to maximize the scientific payoff of gravitational waves, including multimessenger observations, for astrophysics and tests of general relativity. We invite participants from the LIGO/Virgo/GEO/KAGRA/INDIGO, LISA, and PTA communities, as well as participation from those interested in binary astrophysics, massive black holes, measurements of gravitational-wave signatures in CMB polarization, tests of gravitation, and astrostatistics.

Very High Energy Phenomena in the Universe (VHEPU-2014)

Dates: 2014 August 3 - 9
Deadline for Registration and Abstract Submission: 2014 July 1
Place: Quy Nhon, Vietnam

This summer, a "Rencontres du Vietnam" conference will be devoted to 'Very High Energy Phenomena in the Universe'. The main topics will cover:

* Gamma-ray astronomy;
* Cosmic rays;
* Neutrino astronomy;
* Gamma-ray bursts;
* Dark matter;br> * Multi-messenger astronomy (including gravitational waves).

The conference will mainly consist of plenary sessions, with both review and contributed talks. A half day of parallel sessions to cover more specialized subjects my be organized.

High Energy Astrophysics Division (HEAD) of the AAS Meeting

Dates: 2014 August 17 - 21
Website and Abstract Submission Open: 2014 March 5
Meeting Registration and Hotel Reservations Submission Open: 2014 April 28
Deadline for Early Abstract Submission: 2014 May 15
Place: Chicago, Illinois, USA

Special Sessions at the HEAD Meeting:

  • Stellar clusters and star formation (Eric Feigelson)
  • Bridging Laboratory and High Energy Astrophysics (Daniel Savin)
  • Cosmic Rays (Martin Israel & Bob Binns)
  • The Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) (Zaven Arzoumanian)
  • The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) (Fiona Harrison & Daniel Stern)
  • Ballooning & Sounding Rockets (Henric Krawczynski)
  • Science and Technology for a Successor to the Chandra X-ray Observatory (Alexey Vikhlinin & Harvey Tananbaum)
  • The Gravitational Universe (Guido Mueller)
  • Jobs in High Energy Astrophysics: A Panel Discussion (Rosanne Di Stefano)
  • Space Missions: Why Do They Cost So Much? (Joel Bregman)

and a special, first-time-ever evening special session that will be open to the public on 'The Art in Science' organized by Chryssa Kouveliotou.

10th INTEGRAL Workshop: A Synergistic View of the High Energy Sky

Dates: 2014 September 15 - 19
Registration Opens: Early 2014
Early Registration and Payment Deadline: 2014 March 31
Abstract Deadline: 2014 June 1
Late Registration and Payment Deadline: 2014 July 31
Place: Annapolis, Maryland, USA

The goal of this workshop is to present and discuss (via invited and contributed talks and posters) the latest results obtained in the field of high-energy astrophysics using the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory INTEGRAL, and place these results in the context of other operational space-based missions, such as Swift, Fermi, AGILE, NuSTAR, and MAXI as well as ground-based VHE observatories. Correlative studies in lower energy bands, as well as neutrino and gravitational wave observations are included as relevant for various source classes. The central focus of thus workshop is the synergistic view of the high energy sky, addressing the following scientific topics:

  • X-ray binaries (involving black holes, neutron stars, and white dwarfs)
  • Isolated neutron stars (gamma-ray pulsars, magnetars)
  • Nucleosynthesis (SNe, Novae, SNRs, ISM) and γ-ray lines, including 511 keV
  • Galactic diffuse continuum emission (including Galactic Ridge)
  • Massive black holes in AGNs (blazars, and the nucleus of the Milky Way)
  • Sky surveys, source populations and unidentified gamma-ray sources
  • Cosmic background radiation
  • Gamma-ray bursts
  • Progress in data processing and analysis
  • Future instruments and missions

Action item: If you plan to attend this workshop, please send an expression of interest to integral10ws 'at' sciops.esa.int, indicating your preference for a talk or poster, a tentative title, and whether you or your students may be in need of partial financial support.

IAU Symposium 313: Extragalactic Jets from Every Angle

Dates: 2014 September 15 - 19
Deadline for Abstract Submission for Contributed Talks: 2014 March 1
Deadline for Early Online Registration: 2014 April 1
Deadline for Regular Online Registration: 2014 July 1
Deadline for Abstract Submission for Poster Presentations: 2014 July 1
Place: Galapagos Islands, Ecuador

Extragalactic jets provide the direct observational evidence for a connection between supermassive black holes and surrounding cosmic environment. They deliver the energy released by an accreting black hole to large distances and impact the formation and evolution of surrounding structures. The significance of relativistic jets is visible on many physical scales and in a variety of astrophysical sources. They carry information about the black hole power, spin, accretion state and characteristic timescales, and probe the environment beyond the black hole's immediate sphere of infuence.

In recent years, both space and ground based telescopes are providing new insights to investigate jet physics. New data on jets have been accumulating from space missions such as Swift, XMM-Newton, Chandra, Suzaku, Fermi, Hubble, Spitzer and WISE. Upgraded and future ground based facilities such as JVLA, ATCA, ALMA, LOFAR and SKA will provide higher quality data at both the lowest and highest radio frequencies. At higher energies, the atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, HESS, MAGIC, and VERITAS have provided evidence indicating rapid time variability in jets, and in the future these facilities will be augmented by CTA. Although we are now living in a "golden age" and despite the recent progress, many new and unsolved problems specific to the physical mechanisms underlying jet physics are still under debate.

This is an excellent time to bring together observational astronomers working across the electromagnetic spectrum with theorists to address the pressing questions concerning our understanding of the physics of relativistic jets. The open questions to be addressed include unification scenarios for blazars and radio galaxies, the interactions between jets and their environments, the composition and structure of jets and the mechanisms leading to their collimation, the role of magnetic fields, the mechanisms of particle acceleration in jets, the location of high-energy emission sites, and the scaling of physical jet phenomena with black-hole mass, from Galactic to extragalactic sources.

Hawaii 2014: Fourth Joint Meeting of the APS Division of Nuclear Physics with the Physical Society of Japan

Dates: 2014 October 7 - 11
Deadline for Abstract Submission: 2014 July 1
Place: Waikoloa, Hawaii, USA

Within this meeting, there are several half-day workshops on topics of interest to nuclear astrophysics:

  • "Explosive nucleosynthesis in SNe and XRB as multi-messengers"
  • "Neutron stars and the properties of nuclear matter at high densities."

In addition, there will be invited speaker sessions during the meeting on

  • Weak Interaction Rates for Nuclear Astrophysics
  • Advances in Neutrino/Nuclear Physics

and mini-symposia, to which any APS member can submit an abstract for a contributed talk, on

  • Nuclear Matter in Neutron Stars
  • Nuclear Reaction Rates Relevant to Stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis
  • Nuclear and Neutrino Physics of Neutron Star Mergers and its Multi-messenger Imprints

Fifth International Fermi Symposium

Dates: 2014 October 20 - 24
Deadline for Abstracts and Early Registration: 2014 September 7
Deadline for Regular Registration, Hotel Booking and (space permitting) Late Posters: 2014 September 30
Place : Nagoya, Japan

This symposium follows previous Fermi Symposia at Stanford (February 2007), Washington DC (November 2009), Rome, Italy (May 2011) and Monterey, CA (Nov 2012).

The two Fermi instruments have been surveying the high-energy sky since August 2008. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) has discovered more than a thousand new sources and many new source classes, bringing the importance of gamma-ray astrophysics to an ever-broadening community. The LAT catalog includes supernova remnants, pulsar wind nebulae, pulsars, binary systems, novae, several classes of active galaxies, starburst galaxies, normal galaxies, and a large number of unidentified sources. Continuous monitoring of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has uncovered numerous outbursts from a wide range of transients. Fermi LAT's study of diffuse gamma-ray emission in our galaxy revealed giant bubbles shining in gamma rays. The direct measurement of a harder-than-expected cosmic-ray electron spectrum may imply the presence of nearby cosmic-ray accelerators. LAT data have provided stringent constraints on new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark-matter annihilations as well as tests of fundamental physics. The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) continues to be a prolific detector of gamma-ray transients: magnetars, solar flares, terrestrial gamma-ray flashes and gamma-ray bursts at keV to MeV energies, complementing the higher energy LAT observations of those sources in addition to providing valuable science return in their own right.

This meeting will focus on the new scientific investigations and results enabled by Fermi, the mission and instrument characteristics, future opportunities, and coordinated observations and analyses. The best is yet to come!

Chandra Calibration and CIAO Workshop

Dates: 2014 November 17
Details: Soon to Come
Place: Cambridge, Massacusetstts, USA

The workshop will include a morning session discussing recent work on Chandra calibration and CIAO topics and an afternoon hands-on session with CXC staff on hand to answer individual questions and to assist with analysis.

More details will be announced at a later date.

Advanced School on X-ray Astrophysics: Data Analysis of the XMM-Newton, Chandra and Suzaku Missions (A COSPAR CAPACITY BUILDING WORKSHOP )

Dates: 2014 November 17 - 28
Deadline for Applications: 2014 May 30
Place: Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico

WORKSHOP OBJETIVES

  • Provide the participants the tools and skills required to work with and understand data produced in particular by the Suzaku, Chandra and XMM-Newton satellites, working with existing archival data.
  • Introduce scientists to the techniques of X-ray astronomy and detectors, and to the astrophysical processes in real systems that lead to X-ray emission and propagation, both in imaging and spectroscopy.
  • Discuss the forthcoming X-ray missions that will fly in the coming years.

TOPICS

The following topics will be covered in the workshop via both lectures and hands-on work:

  1. Basic theoretical concepts of High Energy Astrophysics
  2. Statistics: basic concepts and applications
  3. High Energy Astronomy Satellites: past, present and future
  4. Software for high-energy astrophysics data analysis - installation, usage, and basic scripting
  5. High energy astrophysics data analysis
    • a. Accessing archival databases for spectral, timing, and imaging data
    • b. Reduction and analysis of spectroscopic, timing and imaging data
    • c. Simultaneous analysis of data from multiple detectors and wavebands
  6. Basics of writing a scientific paper and an observational proposal

DATA AND SOFTWARE

The organizers plan to concentrate on Suzaku, Chandra and XMM-Newton data analysis. Students have to pre-install the software and analysis tools before arrival. The data analysis tools required to process and extract results from the archival data, such as FTOOLS, SAS, and CIAO are also all freely available for a range of operating systems such as Linux and OS X.

TARGET PARTICIPANTS

Ph.D. students, post-doctoral fellows and young researchers from the region and other Latin American countries.

Fifteen Years of Science with Chandra Symposium

Dates: 2014 November 18 - 21
Oral Presentation Abstract Deadline: 2014 August 15
Hotel Reservation Deadline: 2014 October 1
Registraton and Final Abstract Deadline: 2014 October 15
Place: Boston, Massachusetts, USA

The meeting will highlight key science results from the past fifteen years and a panel discussion focusing on key science topics for the next 10+ years of operation of the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Topics and themes will emphasize high resolution imaging and spectroscopy, observations and theory, including related data from other observatories.

The Symposium web page lists the invited speakers and topics.

Swift: 10 Years of Discovery
Dates: 2014 December 2 -5
Online Registration and Abstract Submission: Opened on 2014 July 14
Deadline for Abstract Submission and for Early Bird Fee: 2014 September 30
Last Day for Reduced Congress Fee: 2014 November 14
Place: Rome, Italy

This meeting will celebrate 10 years of Swift successes and will cover recent advances, both from the observational and theoretical sides on our knowledge of the high-energy transients Universe.

When Swift was launched on November 20, 2004, its prime objective was to chase Gamma-Ray Bursts. However, its multi-wavelength and fast scheduling capacities make it the most versatile mission ever flown. Beside GRBs, It has been used for studying an impressive variety of targets such as AGNs, supernovae, novae, variable stars, unidentified gamma-ray sources etc. Swift has observed sources covering a wide range of redshifts, out to the most distant transient objects in the Universe. The rich variety of source classes scrutinized by Swift will be addressed in this meeting with dedicated sessions. The current knowledge on GRB, as well as other galactic and extragalactic transient sources will be thoroughly discussed, reviewing our current view and providing new perspective for the future, both from theoretical and observational point of view.

Sessions will be devoted to:

  • Swift and the future GRB missions
  • GRB I (physics: jets & progenitors)
  • GRB II (high-z GRBs and cosmology)
  • GRB III (short GRBs)
  • Low luminosity - Very Long GRBs
  • GRB-SNe connection
  • Magnetars
  • Supernovae
  • Compact objects and the Galactic center
  • Swift catalogs
  • Tidal Disruption Events
  • AGNs - Blazars
  • Multiwavelength - Multimessenger astronomy

High Energy Astrophysics Division (HEAD) of the AAS Meeting

Dates: 2016 Spring
place: TBD, USA

High Energy Astrophysics Division (HEAD) of the AAS Meeting

Dates: 2017 August
Place: Jackson Hole, Wyoming, USA

Other Selected Astronomy, Physics and Space Science meetings

Supernovae in the Local Universe: Celebrating 10,000 Days of Supernova 1987A

Dates: 2014 August 11 - 15
Registration and Abstract Submission Opens: 2013 December 1
Deadline for Early Registration and Abstract Submission: 2014 May 15
Place: Coffs Harbour, New South Wales, Australia

Supernovae are a core element of modern astrophysics, providing fundamental insights into stellar evolution, the interstellar medium, astroparticle physics, nucleosynthesis and cosmology. While astronomers now routinely detect enormous numbers of supernovae every year at increasingly large distances, wide-field surveys and all-sky monitoring are now providing an important new element to such studies: there are a growing number of new supernovae being discovered very close to home.

Our modern understanding of supernovae in the local Universe began with Supernova 1987A, for which mid-2014 marks 10,000 days since its discovery. Since that singular event, many other supernovae have been found within tens of megaparsecs of Earth. These events have allowed detailed studies of individual sources and their environments, providing new physical insight on progenitor stars, explosion mechanisms and their aftermath.

At this conference we will explore all the rich information that nearby supernovae now provide, and will discuss ways in which the new generation of wide-field surveys can further add to this harvest. Topics to be discussed will include:

* Observations and modelling of individual nearby supernovae
* Observations and constraints on supernova progenitors
* Progenitor mass loss, pre-supernova activity and supernova "imposters"
* Theories of core collapse, thermonuclear supernovae and explosion mechanisms
* Supernova 1987A at 10,000 days
* Historical supernovae, young supernova remnants and light echoes
* Wide-field surveys, automated classification and new types of transients
* Future instruments: SKA, LSST, eROSITA

IAU Symposium 313: Extragalactic Jets from Every Angle

Dates: 2014 September 15 - 19
Abstract Submission Opens: 2013 November 1
Deadline for Abstract Submission for Contributed Talks: 2014 March 1
Deadline for Early Registration: 2014 April 1
Deadline for Abstract Submission for Posters: 2014 July 1
Deadline for Regular Registration: 2014 July 1
Place: Galapagos, Ecuador

Extragalactic jets provide the direct observational evidence for a connection between supermassive black holes and surrounding cosmic environment. They deliver the energy released by an accreting black hole to large distances and impact the formation and evolution of surrounding structures. The significance of relativistic jets is visible on many physical scales and in a variety of astrophysical sources. They carry information about the black hole power, spin, accretion state and characteristic timescales, and probe the environment beyond the black hole's immediate sphere of influence.

In recent years, both space and ground based telescopes are providing new insights to investigate jet physics. New data on jets have been accumulating from space missions such as Swift, XMM-Newton, Chandra, Suzaku, Fermi, Hubble, Spitzer and WISE. Upgraded and future ground based facilities such as JVLA, ATCA, ALMA, LOFAR and SKA will provide higher quality data at both the lowest and highest radio frequencies. At higher energies, the atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, HESS, MAGIC, and VERITAS have provided evidence indicating rapid time variability in jets, and in the future these facilities will be augmented by CTA. Although we are now living in a 'golden age' and despite the recent progress, many new and unsolved problems specific to the physical mechanisms underlying jet physics are still under debate.

This is an excellent time to bring together observational astronomers working across the electromagnetic spectrum with theorists to address the pressing questions concerning our understanding of the physics of relativistic jets. The open questions to be addressed include unification scenarios for blazars and radio galaxies, the interactions between jets and their environments, the composition and structure of jets and the mechanisms leading to their collimation, the role of magnetic fields, the mechanisms of particle acceleration in jets, the location of high-energy emission sites, and the scaling of physical jet phenomena with black-hole mass, from Galactic to extragalactic sources.

Cosmology with Galaxy Clusters in the XXIst Century

Dates: 2014 November 4 - 7
Deadline for Registration: 2014 August 31
Place: Madrid, Spain

Cosmology with galaxy clusters is now entering the precision era. Therefore, it is timely to discuss what we achieved so far and what can be achieved in the near future. The main topics that will be discussed are:

  • Past, present & future surveys: what we know now, what we do not know yet, what we need to know soon to use galaxy clusters as cosmological probes;
  • Multi-wavelength scaling relations for a robust estimate of the cluster masses;
  • Accuracy and precision in the galaxy cluster mass reconstruction;
  • Cluster simulations.

PLANCK 2014: The Microwave Sky in Temperature and Polarization

Dates: 2014 December 1 - 5
Registration and Abstract Submission: Now open
Deadline for Abstract Submission: 2014 September 15
Deadline for Registration: 2014 November 20
Ferrara, Italy

This conference is dedicated to the scientific results of the second cosmological data release from Planck, the ESA mission to map the anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background ( http://www.esa.int/Planck). Results from other experiments will be presented and discussed as well.

Planck was launched in May 2009 and surveyed the sky continuously until October 2013. A first release happened in March 2013, comprising only temperature data for the first fifteen months of observation, or about two nominal surveys. The second release will take place in late 2014 and will present all of the Planck sky surveys, in temperature and polarization. High quality maps of Cosmic Microwave Background intensity and polarization will be derived, as well as of many astrophysical foregrounds, including synchrotron, free-free and dust emission from the Milky Way, radio and far-infrared emission from external galaxies, the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect in clusters of galaxies, and the Cosmic Infrared Background. The Planck data therefore address an extremely broad range of cosmological and astrophysical science. This conference provides a scientific forum where the scientific results will be discussed.

American Astronomical Society Meeting 225

Dates: 2015 January 4 - 8
Place: Seattle, Washington, USA

Hubble 2020: Building on 25 Years of Discovery

Dates: 2015 April 20 - 23
Place: Baltimore, Maryland, USA

To mark the 25th anniversary of the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope, and with an eye towards the future, this symposium will celebrate the extraordinary impact that the Hubble Space Telescope has had on science, culture, and public engagement through three main goals:

  • First, to focus on Hubble's scientific legacy through 2020, highlighting synergies with ongoing space missions.
  • Second, to delineate and inspire the scientific overlap between Hubble and the James Webb Space Telescope.
  • Third, to pave the way for the WFIRST/AFTA telescope and for the next generation of large optical/UV telescopes in space.

Please save the date! Additional information will be posted on the symposium website.

If you have any questions, please email hst25@stsci.edu.

XXIV IAU General Assembly

Dates: 2015 August 3 - 14
Place: Honolulu, Hawaii, USA

American Astronomical Society Meeting 227

Dates: 2016 January 3 - 7
Place: Kissimmee, Florida, USA

American Astronomical Society Meeting 228

Dates: 2016 June 12 - 16
Place: San Diego, California, USA

Selected Astronomy-related Technology (e.g., Instrumentation) Meetings

None


Selected Astronomy-related Physics, Computational, Data Analysis, Software or Statistics Meetings

None


Selected Space Science-related Education and Public Outreach Meetings

None


Page Author: Stephen A. Drake (e-mail: Stephen.A.Drake 'at' nasa.gov)



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