The TESS Cycle 6 Call For Proposals is now Live! To read the Call for Proposals please click here. Cycle 6 Proposals are due Apr 14, 2023.
TESS

Science Support Center

TESS

Science Support Center

FIRST LIGHT

On Tuesday, Aug 7th 2018 NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Satellite Survey took its “first light” science image. This image was of the Large Magellanic Cloud and the bright star R Doradus.

For more information see here

Image Credit: NASA/MIT/TESS

TESS

Science Support Center

Comet Catching

Before NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Satellite Survey began science operations, the planet hunter sent back a stunning sequence of serendipitous images showing the motion of a comet. This is comet C/2018 N1, mapped here over a 17 hour period by TESS on June 25th 2018.

For more information see here

Massachusetts Institute of Technology/NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

TESS

Science Support Center

Northern Sky Mosaic

During its second year of operation TESS observed the northern hemisphere. Combining 208 images taken by TESS, this mosaic of the northern sky was created. Many celestial objects can be seen within this image, but most noticeable is the arc of the Milky Way - our home.

For more information look here

Image Credit: NASA/MIT/TESS and Ethan Kruse (USRA).

TESS

Science Support Center

Galactic Graveyard

MACS 2129-1 is a massive 'dead' disk galaxy. It stopped making stars only a few billion years after the Big Bang! It is now a cosmic cemetery of red dying stars.

For more information about this cosmic horror see here

Image Credit: NASA-JPL/Caltech.

TESS

Science Support Center

Worlds orbiting other stars

The worlds orbiting other stars are called “exoplanets,” and they come in a wide variety of sizes, from gas giants larger than Jupiter to small, rocky planets about as big around as Earth or Mars. This rocky super-Earth is an illustration of the type of planet NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Satellite Survey can find.

For more information look here

Image Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser.

TESS

Science Support Center

AU Mic b

AU Microscopii is among the youngest planetary system observed by astronomers. The planet is located less than 32 light-years from Earth and its host star throws vicious temper tantrums!

For more information look here

Image Credit: NASA-JPL/Caltech.

TESS

Science Support Center

LHS 3844b

Discovered in 2018 by NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Satellite Survey, LHS 3844b is a rocky planet located 48.6 light-years away with a radius 1.3 times that of Earth. The host to this planet is a cool M dwarf star, one of the most common and long-lived type stars in our galaxy.

For more information look here

Image Credit:/JPL-Caltech


News for scientists

TESS Special News Bulletin

Welcome TESS community to this special news bulletin!

We would like to inform you of an update to the Web TESS Viewing Tool (WTV). This tool has now been replaced by the new and improved TESS-point Web Tool, which has all the same functions, but is more precise and streamlined ...

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TESS at the AAS!

The TESS GI office will be at the AAS 241 meeting in Seattle! We're excited to see talks and posters from the community on TESS. Below is a schedule of all the TESS related talks, posters, and sessions at the AAS 241 meeting. Please visit us at the NASA booth ...

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Cycle 6 Call for Proposals is now Live!

The TESS GI Cycle 6 Call for Proposals is now live! The full announcement is below. Please note that the TESS GI webpages, pointing tools, and the ARK/RPS proposal submission webpage will be updated for Cycle 6 in January 2023. GI Cycle 6 Proposals are due April 14, 2023 ...

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Cycle 6 Proposal Information

Submit a TESS Proposal

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